Categories Diet, Health

Macrobiotic Diet

Macrobiotic Diet

Macrobiotics refers to the science of longevity and health. It is based on the view that each person is largely influenced by their environment and social interactions as well as the geography and climate of the place they live in.

Macrobiotics views illnesses as the body’s attempt to return to a more dynamic and harmonious state with nature. It highly stresses the importance of a healthy diet as one of the major factors that affect a person’s health and well-being.

A macrobiotic diet not only refers to a daily diet, but it also embraces the importance of living with healthy lifestyle habits for the long term.

What Foods Are Included in a Macrobiotic Diet?

A macrobiotic diet prioritizes locally grown foods which are prepared in a natural manner. Undertaking a macrobiotic diet also means taking extra care in the way the foods are being prepared and cooked. There is a strong emphasis on eating foods that are baked, boiled and steamed and using little fried and processed foods.

Whole grains, vegetables, fermented soy, fish, nuts, soups, seeds and fruits are the main composition of a macrobiotic diet. Other natural food products can also be incorporated in the diet.

The composition of a macrobiotic diet can be altered in order to suit an individual’s needs, with consideration of their particular health status.

This allows those with specific conditions, or even dietary requirements or preferences, to fine-tune their diet, whilst still adhering to macrobiotic principles and recommendations.

People who are utilizing a macrobiotic diet are encouraged to condition themselves to eat slowly and chew their food thoroughly.

What Foods Are NOT Included in a Macrobiotic Diet?

Since a macrobiotic diet strongly recommends that foods must be eaten in their most natural state, processed foods should be avoided. Fatty meats, dairy products, sugar, caffeine, refined flour, alcohol, poultry, zucchini and potatoes are some examples of foods that should not be included in the macrobiotic diet.

Macrobiotics aims to achieve balance in every aspect of your life. Therefore, foods which are highly-concentrated and over stimulating should also be eliminated from the daily diet.

Macrobiotic Diet Studies

Some studies reveal that following a macrobiotic diet has helped many people lower their levels of blood pressure and serum lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides). This is why some experts suggest that this kind of diet can also be used as an effective means of preventing the emergence of many cardiovascular diseases.

Many experts also believe that a macrobiotic diet can also serve as a valuable inclusion in a cancer prevention plan. However, the macrobiotic diet remains the subject of controversy as many experts doubt its benefits when practiced by people who have diagnosed malignancies.

On the other hand, many anecdotal reports claim that its therapeutic effects are remarkable to patients who are suffering from advanced cancer diseases. However, to date very few studies have been conducted that would prove or disprove the benefits of a macrobiotic diet.

Further studies are warranted in order to prove the effectiveness of a macrobiotic diet in cancer prevention. Other concerns expressed by some experts include claimed risks of nutritional deficiencies.

However, it is difficult to dismiss the long term health benefits of any diet which is based on the consumption of organic and locally grown foods and the exclusion of highly processed ingredients.

Categories Diet, Health

10 foods that sound healthy but aren’t

1. Sweetened yogurt

The average cup of flavored yogurt has 30 grams of sugar (7.5 teaspoons) — that’s as much as a chocolate bar! Some sugar occurs naturally in the yogurt, but most is added. Instead: Cut the sugar by making your own blend. Start with plain Greek yogurt and add fresh fruit, one teaspoon of jam or a drizzle of honey.

2. Bran muffins

They sound healthy because of the word bran, right? Reality check: the average donut shop bran muffin has almost 400 calories and a whopping 36 grams (9 teaspoons) of sugar — but only 4 grams of fiber. Instead: Make your own small muffins and freeze them for grab-and-go mornings.

3. Sushi

The fish is great, but when you’re mostly eating white rice and dipping it in soy sauce, you’re getting lots of refined carbohydrates and sodium. Instead: Opt for more fish (sashimi), less white rice (or choose brown rice if it’s an option), and some vegetables on the side. Use soy sauce sparingly, and add flavor with wasabi.

4. Gummy fruit snacks

Any time “fruit juice concentrate” appears on the ingredient list, translate it to mean sugar. Isolating the sugar from fruit to make processed fruit-flavored gummies is not the same as eating nutrient-rich, fiber-filled, fresh fruit. Instead: Opt for fresh fruit or real dried fruit, such as raisins, dates or prunes.

5. Hazelnut-chocolate spread

The health halo is about milk, cocoa and hazelnuts, but the ingredient list tells a different story: sugar and palm oil are the main ingredients, and neither is nutritious. If you compare a hazelnut-chocolate spread to chocolate frosting, you will see the same amounts of sugar and fat. Instead: Stick with peanut or almond butter.

6. Veggie sticks

I don’t mean carrots and celery! I’m talking about those bags of fried or baked snacks — crunchy sticks made from corn flour and potato starch with a dusting of spinach or beet powder for color. Yeah, those don’t count as vegetables. Instead: Try a platter of real vegetable sticks — cucumbers, peppers and carrots.

7. Water with vitamins

Water is essential to life, and so are vitamins. But when the two are combined in a bottle with food coloring and sugar, an unnecessary product is created. Instead: Drink plain water or jazz it up with citrus or mint. You get all the vitamins you need from food, or you can take a multivitamin when indicated (they have no sugar!).

8. Sweetened oatmeal

Oats are a nutritious whole grain, but not when your morning bowl is coated in three teaspoons of sugar. Skip the maple or brown sugar flavor packets. Instead: Make your own plain oatmeal with grated apple, coconut, mashed banana or fresh berries.

9. Granola bars

Often touted for their whole grain goodness, most granola bars are sticky-sweet junk food in disguise. Don’t let a few oats fool you — especially when you also see marshmallows and chocolate chips. Instead: If granola bars are a must-have, choose one with 6 grams of sugar or less per bar, and hopefully some fiber.

10. Pretzels

In the low-fat era, pretzels were the king of snack foods. But now we know that their refined flour and salt are just as detrimental to heart health as fatty foods, so pretzels have been reclassified to junk food. Instead: Crunch on air-popped popcorn.

None of these foods are off-limits, but it’s important to know the honest truth behind what you’re eating. Consider the 80:20 rule: If you eat well 80 per cent of the time, it’s alright to choose some of these indulgent foods 20 per cent of the time.

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