Categories Self Defense

Did James Bond Know REAL Hand to Hand Combat?

At any time when an motion film becomes a giant hit there may be all the time a rush to emulate the heroes of the film. Whether it’s buying film merchandise or real life items like cars, firearms, and garments people get right into a film whole heartedly. Martial arts movies aren’t any different as people run out to the local dojo to coach within the art that helped the hero save the day. Most honest martial arts instructors will explain that it takes years to learn a martial art, and that those movies are seldom example of how any martial art really works. Film makers are seldom satisfied with reality and feel a necessity to enhance upon even essentially the most impressive real life situations. The exception though is when knowledgeable persons are involved with a project and its creation and reality develop into a part of the fantasy.

The James Bond series is example of a mix of fantasy and reality. The fantasy side of James Bond is he’s capable of accomplish what normally takes an entire team of operatives to do in real life espionage assignments. He doesn’t need to cope with any of the dirty or boring parts of intelligence gathering (read sitting in an uncomfortable place, drinking coffee and waiting for terribly long periods of time). Many agents of the CIA and British MI6 will inform you that loads of what they do is boring, but can still develop into extremely dangerous in a blink of an eye fixed. For a lot of agents an project involves slogging through the mud of some third world hellhole not dinning at the best restaurants in a number of the world’s most beautiful cities.

What the fictional 007 does draw from reality is his martial arts forms. Excluding one film, You Only Live Twice where 007 learned Ninjitsu (taught to Sean Connery by real life martial arts expert Donn Draeger) the martial art of alternative for the British spy in over 20 movies is combat Judo. The martial arts form allows Bond to tackle much larger opponents, and use their weight against them in personal combat. In From Russia with Love Bond was capable of tackle a well armed assassin, and switch the tables because of his Judo training. For a spy coping with an ever changing battlefield, pre-world war II Judo is the right alternative, since it allowed him to be flexible, and different techniques could be seen scattered throughout the movies. This type of Judo is nothing if not practical and for a spy operating alone in the sector there aren’t any second possibilities. Bond was capable of quickly defeat enemies and move on with the mission.

The fact of James Bond’s world comes from his creator Ian Fleming who drew from his many adventures and experiences on the earth of espionage. Before Fleming wrote twelve novels and nine short stories featuring James Bond, undercover agent 007 he would have many adventurers of his own. Educated at each Eton College and Sandhurst military academy Fleming would also go on to learn languages and work as each a stockbroker and journalist. Like Bond he enjoyed, many activities like scuba diving, mountaineering, auto racing in addition to smoking and drinking. When World War II began Fleming was a military reservist a part of the famous Black Watch regiment, but transferred to the intelligence branch of the Royal Navy by its director Rear Admiral John Godfrey. Like his favorite character he would achieve the rank of Commander and participate within the planning of many operations within the European theater of the war.

Lots of the code names for these operations would later develop into names of Bond novels, and several other of the characters of his books are said to be based of real people Fleming met while working within the British intelligence community. No one is precisely sure who Bond was based off of, however it is believed he was a mix of several colourful characters Fleming knew. He also helped setup the structure for the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) which might later develop into the CIA. During this time he was exposed to the numerous commando units who were using Judo as a part of their unarmed combat training. Fleming would command his own unit of raiders and made sure to incorporate Judo as apart of their training.

Though it is just rumored that Fleming trained a secret Camp X in Canada which trained spies and commandos in close combat, assassination techniques, and sabotage a recent book says it more likely he just visited. What is obvious though is Fleming learned well from what he saw, and he brought that to his writing. Fleming who helped to create the trendy intelligence agency would spend the post war years making a fictional world of spies and terrorists.

Though fictional Bond’s martial art of alternative remains to be taught to intelligence operatives and stays the perfect alternative some 50 years later. Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) the UK’s Special Forces branch still use most of the commando tactics learned in WWII today. WWII combatives which include Judo have stood the test of time on screen, and on the battlefields of the world. Fleming and his peers did not have the posh of looking good on a mission. They needed what worked against the Nazis and the Imperial Japanese, and Judo was the alternative of the founders of recent espionage.

Categories Self Defense

Learn How To Kick – Kicking Effectively In A Self-Defense Or Combat Situation Part 9 Of 10

This ten article series will take care of the assorted components that have to be addressed when considering the utilization of a specific kick in a combat or self-defense situation. These ten components may also be utilized by the tournament competitor although certain segments would should be modified barely for the tournament facets of kicking, fairly than the more intensive nature of using a kick or kicks in combat. Although all of those individual components are vital, they’re only when combined together and utilized accurately when executing a kick.

Although I’ll only be discussing certainly one of the components in this text, here is the whole list of all ten of them.

1. Your Kicking Ability

2. Your Intended Application

3. The Environment

4. Telegraphing

5. Striking Implement

6. Striking the Correct Goal

7. Initial Impact

8. Impact

9. Retraction or Follow Through

10. Return to Fighting Position

Component Nine; Retraction or Follow Through:

Now I used to be at all times told from the primary day that I began taking Karate that regardless of what kick you probably did, that you just never wanted to go away your foot “hanging” out within the air. There have been three primary reasons for this they usually are as follows.

1. The longer your kicking leg is “hanging” within the air, the longer you’ve got to balance on one leg.

As hard as a few of you could find this to consider, we humans were born with two legs for a reason, and that’s to face on each of them. We weren’t designed to be standing around all day like a pink flamingo with one leg “hanging” out within the air.

Now I’m all for extensive training on balancing on one leg while kicking and I even have several different training exercises that I do with the intention to improve my balance. Nonetheless, the keyword here is “training.” When in an actual situation where you’ve got to defend yourself, you should get your foot up and out to make contact with its intended goal as fast as possible, after which immediately get it back down on the bottom.

2. The longer your kicking leg is “hanging” within the air, the better it’s in your opponent to grab.

Ever watch a boxing match where certainly one of the boxers has a bent to go away his punch in his opponent’s face, or is only a bit too slow in bringing it back into position? What normally happens to that boxer?

Well, generally if the opposite boxer is any good, he’ll land at the least a punch or two on his opponent. Why? Because by leaving his punch “hanging” out within the air, he leaves himself wide open for a counterattack. Now as bad as that is, it’s over and over worse when you’re kicking. Not only do you allow yourself balancing on one leg, but you furthermore mght leave yourself wide open for a wide range of counterattacks. These can range anywhere from a punch, kick, and even tackling or throwing you to the bottom, and these aren’t even the worst.

The worst of all possible counterattacks is to have your kicking leg grabbed by your opponent. Why is that this the worst? Simply put, since you then now not have control of your body, your opponent does.

3. The longer your kicking leg is “hanging” within the air, the longer it takes before you’ll be able to execute one other kick.

Do this experiment:

Take one leg and hold it up within the air at about waist height, now leaving it up within the air, execute an efficient and practical kick. Now try throwing a few punches while standing on one leg. Does it work thoroughly?

A kick coming up from a balanced position on the bottom is much more practical and powerful than one which starts off already within the air. What I mean by that is that the primary Roundhouse Kick that you just throw from a standing position is way more powerful than the second that you just throw with the identical leg before setting your foot back down on the bottom.

For those who are executing a kick that relies on the foot being returned along the very same path of trajectory that it traveled to get to its goal, this could be called a “retraction” of the kicking foot. The next kicks could be ones that may require you to “retract” your kicking foot after making contact along with your goal.

1. Front Kick

2. Back Kick

3. Side Kick

4. Roundhouse Kick (with the notable exception of the Thai Roundhouse Kick)

For those who are executing a kick that relies on the foot continuing through the goal along the identical path of trajectory that it traveled to get to its goal, this could be called a “follow through” of the kicking foot. The next kicks could be ones that may require you to “follow through” along with your kicking foot after making contact along with your goal.

1. Wheel Kick

2. Axe Kick

3. Crescent Kick

4. Reverse Crescent Kick

5. Hook Kick

6. Hatchet Kick

Training Advice to Improve your Retraction and/or Follow Through:

Under normal standard training practices, the scholar attempts to execute a kick as fast as he can from a standing position to the goal. On this case, I’m going to have you ever do the precise opposite.

This can be a fairly easy, yet very effective, technique that you may practice with the intention to improve your retraction or follow up skills. Simply put, what you do is take your kicking foot and slowly place it within the position where it will have made contact along with your intended goal. As soon as you leg and foot are in position, as fast as you probably can, complete the kick by completing the retraction or follow through. At all times ensure and utilize the right technique in any respect times.

Final Thoughts:

As fast as your foot traveled to strike its goal, it needs to be just as fast if not faster returning back right down to the bottom. Aside from improper technique and improper application of the aforementioned technique, leaving your foot “hanging” or “posing” within the air after kicking is maybe the only biggest mistake you possibly can possibly make when kicking.

This “hanging” or “posing” appears to be prevalent in quite a lot of the tournament oriented schools more so than the normal schools. Although I actually have seen students “posing” kicks in each sorts of schools.

Categories Self Defense

Combat Wrist Locks – Advanced Control Secrets From The Ninja’s Self Defense Art of Ninpo-Taijutsu

Wrist locks are a reasonably common self defense technique, especially throughout the grappling or “soft” arts like jujitsu and aikido. Within the Ninja’s self defense art, often called ninpo-taijutsu (or “budo” taijutsu to some), there are some very advanced secrets for gaining maximum control over your opponent together with your wrist locks.

This text takes a take a look at the “anatomy” of the wrist, after which matches this very vital information with the essential locks and jams that the art of Ninjutsu applies to the wrist joint. After reading this lesson, and adding the important thing points to your personal training, you should have the power to extend your control over anyone who’s on the receiving end of considered one of these self defense techniques.

Let me begin by saying that, it’s only natural for a student recent to the art of Ninjutsu, or some other system which employs wrist locks, to deal with what the technique “looks like.” It appears to be easy anyway. The teacher merely grabs the attacker’s hand together with his “this manner,” and does X,Y,Z to the wrist.

But, even when not immediately apparent, the coed will begin to note that she or he is just not getting the identical results because the teacher. Oh sure, they’re “twisting the wrist,” however the opponent is not ending up in the identical place – or doesn’t go down the identical way that the teacher demonstrated. As they progress towards mastery, it is a natural tendency for the advancing student to need to have more of the identical control that his or her teacher does.

And, it’s here that we start a much deeper study of this basic self defense technique.

With regards to learning, teaching, or applying the art of Ninjutsu to any problem or situation, I’m an enormous fan of “strategic considering.” That implies that I step back from the main points and the step-by-step mechanics of the technique, to get an even bigger picture. In other word…

I would like to see the forest that’s comprised of the trees. After which, with this understanding, I can return in and take a look at the main points from an entire recent perspective where each part, piece, or move inside a way – does something specific – and is just not just there because “that is the best way our style does it.”

What this implies in relation to a wrist lock is that this…

What we call the wrist is definitely a group of bones, gaps, connective tissue, and what-not – a group of many various parts which go together to create this thing called a “wrist.”

Now, I do not must be a physician or scientist to grasp that the wrist is a “universal joint,” able to the best range of motion (out of the three joint types within the body). But, even so, the joint itself does have it’s limitations. And, that is where the wrist locking and folding techniques are available in.

I find it helpful, when teaching these advancing concepts to students, to make use of the analogy of the airplane “joystick” almost about the wrist. Because, they’ll each be moved the very same way.

Within the aviation world, they use the terms:

  • Pitch – which is the up/down movement or direction to achieve or decrease elevation.
  • Yaw – the side to side motion or direction, and…
  • Rotation – which after all is the spiral, or spinning of the craft.

And, the wrist may be moved the identical way.

To get this, follow together with me while extending your hand out in front of you. It might be palm up or palm down – but, either way, the palm must be parallel, and even with the bottom.

Now, lift and lower your fingers and hand from the wrist, without moving the forearm. That is “pitch.”

After leveling out your palm again, move your fingers backward and forward, without turning the palm toward the side. That is “yaw.” And eventually…

Simply rotate the hand backward and forward – turn it. That is “rotation.” (You may even find that, unlike the “pitch” and “yaw” directions which may be done “from” the wrist joint itself, “rotation” is definitely done from the forearm.)

What does this must do with joint locks?

The whole lot!

Since you will not be doing a little “thing” called a wrist lock to your opponent’s body. When applying these martial arts techniques, you might be doing “something” to the “structure” of your opponent’s joint – which limits movement and truly has a feedback effect that causes his body to ‘backfire’ on itself!

It’s when you may see beyond the step-by-step movements of your techniques, including the wrist locks, that you’re going to have the option to see that this system is absolutely about hyper-flexing, or extending the joint farther than it’s designed to go! But, to do this, you should know which parts are to be moved, and which parts must be immobilized to get the locking, shearing, and overall controlling effect that you simply’re searching for.

Then, you will have the option to see that the joint locking techniques of ninpo-taijutsu actually benefit from the weakness inherent within the wrist, along the directional lines that I outlined earlier. So…

  • Omote-Gyaku (‘obvious reversal’) is a “rotational-based” wrist lock
  • Hon Gyaku (‘principle reversal’) is a “yaw-based” locking control
  • Take-Ori (‘bamboo-breaking’) is a “pitch-based” reversal, and…
  • Ura Gyaku (‘hidden reversal’) is a mix lock which applies each “rotational” and “yaw-based” force to the wrist.

And, as you progress, you’ll come to seek out that, not only will these techniques be rather more powerful for you, but you may even understand tips on how to apply your personal unique locks which mix two or more of the above directions…

…and even do all three either concurrently, or in succession to maintain your attacker off-balance, confused, and completely under your control!