Healthy Eating
Categories Diet, Videos, Weight Loss

Healthy Eating Video Course

With this video course you are going to understand the importance of eating healthy and how food impacts our bodies and functions. Without understanding exactly why our bodies react to food the way they do, it can sometimes be difficult to stay on track.

But there are many ways that you can begin to understand why eating healthy foods is so important, and exactly how to begin on a healthy eating journey. Let’s not waste any more time. We should begin eating healthy today!

Topics covered:

Why Eat Healthy?
Understanding Your Relationship with Food
The Dangers of Diet Trends
The Food Pyramid
How Food Can Be Your Medicine
The Health Benefits of Eating Vegetables
The Health Benefits of Eating Fruits
The Best Meat to Eat for Healthy Living
The Dangers of Processed Foods
Bringing It All Together with Meal Planning

 

 

Emotional over eating
Categories Diet, Weight Loss

How to Stop Emotional Over Eating

Emotional overeating disorders can be difficult and devastating for those who suffer from them. What makes this happen?

Why is it that some people, knowingly or unknowingly, turn to food for comfort? Here are some thoughts and ideas on those questions.

Emotional overeating disorder is a general term that refers to any of various eating habits where genuine hunger is not the motivational factor.

It is more common among women than men, but men are not immune – especially young men in their teens and twenties.

Those who suffer from this disorder associate food with emotional comfort, and will turn to eating to escape negative feelings.

Past Trauma. For some with emotional overeating disorder, the problem stems from past traumatic events.

Someone who suffered sexual abuse, for example, or some other kind of sexual trauma may overeat in response to feelings of anxiety and confusion.

The result is a fatter body, which some sources suggest may cause the sufferer to feel ‘protected’ from being attractive to the opposite sex.

Subconsciously or consciously, the sufferer wants to be unattractive. Other examples of past trauma or unmet needs may cause a person to turn to emotional overeating.

Poor Self-Image. People who suffer from low self-esteem and a negative self-image may seek escape by overeating.

In a way, emotional overeating is a physical expression of what the sufferer feels inside, and the resulting weight projects the same image of self-disrespect.

Self-Medication. Like alcoholics, those who struggle with emotional overeating may be unconsciously using food as a drug. Eating numbs or dulls the emotions that might be too hard to deal with otherwise.

Depression. Studies indicate a strong correlation between depression and emotional overeating. Ironically, sometimes as depression grows worse a sufferer loses weight; weight loss means the sufferer is not eating as much, and therefore not engaging in his or her coping mechanism.

Stress. Prolonged, unrelieved stress can have a profound effect on the body. Stress stimulates the body to produce, among other chemicals, the hormone cortisol.

Cortisol apparently has a hunger-stimulating effect, and as the stressful emotions increase along with the cortisol, a cycle of emotional eating can play out. 

Stress, via cortisol, also increases the physical craving for carbohydrates. Cortisol production triggers the release of a brain chemical called neuropeptide Y, which causes the desire for carbohydrate consumption.

 

Could You Have an Eating Disorder?

Do you find yourself gaining weight during times of stress? Do you fear boredom because you know you’ll simply eat to fill the time?

These are just some of the symptoms of emotional overeating. If you think you may suffer from this relatively common eating disorder, here are some signs and symptoms that may help you identify whether or not this is what you’re struggling with.

Mindless Eating

If you have a binge eating disorder or emotional overeating problem, you may stuff food in and not even really taste it or realize what you’re doing. It’s as though you are “out of it” and just mindlessly stuffing food into your mouth.

Feelings of Guilt and Shame

Many people with emotional overeating disorders feel really embarrassed and hateful of themselves after they’ve got through with an eating binge.

The problem, of course, is that these negative feelings may make you reach for more food for comfort.

Eating in Secret

Because of being embarrassed, may emotional overeaters will eat in private, reserving their “naughty” foods for when no one is looking.

Always on My Mind…

Do you think about food all the time? Do you feel anxious about the prospect of leaving the house without snacks or money to buy food?

Constantly thinking about food (food obsession) may be a sign that you have an emotional overeating disorder.

Feeling Sick

Sometimes, emotional overeaters will eat and eat to comfort themselves, and then feel sick afterward.

Obviously, this is your body’s way of telling you you’ve eaten far too much more than is good for you; but for emotional overeaters, this sickness does not necessarily deter the next binge.

Identify Your Triggers

Emotional overeating is usually triggered by something – emotions, yes, but sometimes we need to be more specific than that.

Identifying your personal triggers can go a long way toward helping you overcome the disorder. Basic trigger categories include:

* Emotional – Eating to relieve boredom, stress, or anxiety

* Psychological – You may eat in response to negative, self-destructive thoughts

* Environmental/Situational – You may eat simply because the opportunity is there. Also in this category is the habit of eating while doing another activity, such as reading or watching TV.

Do any of these signs and symptoms describe you? If so, don’t despair – there are treatment options available for emotional overeaters.

Check with your healthcare provider for advice on therapists or specialists in your area.

 

What Causes Emotional Overeating Disorder?

Emotional overeating disorders can be difficult and devastating for those who suffer from them.

What makes this happen? Why is it that some people, knowingly or unknowingly, turn to food for comfort? Here are some thoughts and ideas on those questions.

Emotional overeating disorder is a general term that refers to any of various eating habits where genuine hunger is not the motivational factor.

It is more common among women than men, but men are not immune – especially young men in their teens and twenties.

Those who suffer from this disorder associate food with emotional comfort, and will turn to eating to escape negative feelings.

Past Trauma

For some with emotional overeating disorder, the problem stems from past traumatic events.

Someone who suffered sexual abuse, for example, or some other kind of sexual trauma may overeat in response to feelings of anxiety and confusion.

The result is a fatter body, which some sources suggest may cause the sufferer to feel “protected” from being attractive to the opposite sex. Subconsciously or consciously, the sufferer wants to be unattractive.

Other examples of past trauma or unmet needs may cause a person to turn to emotional overeating.

Poor Self-Image

People who suffer from low self-esteem and a negative self-image may seek escape by overeating. In a way, emotional overeating is a physical expression of what the sufferer feels inside, and the resulting weight projects the same image of self-disrespect.

Self-Medication

Like alcoholics, those who struggle with emotional overeating may be unconsciously using food as a drug. Eating numbs or dulls the emotions that might be too hard to deal with otherwise.

Depression

Studies indicate a strong correlation between depression and emotional overeating. Ironically, sometimes as depression grows worse a sufferer loses weight; weight loss means the sufferer is not eating as much, and therefore not engaging in his or her coping mechanism.

Stress

Prolonged, unrelieved stress can have a profound effect on the body. Stress stimulates the body to produce, among other chemicals, the hormone cortisol.

Cortisol apparently has a hunger-stimulating effect, and as the stressful emotions increase along with the cortisol, a cycle of emotional eating can play out.

Individual Triggers

There are triggers or causes of emotional overeating that are not necessarily in the categories above. Some examples might be:

* Boredom
* Oral need or a need to satisfy your mouth’s need to do something
* Social pressure or embarrassment at eating in public, resulting in overeating in private
* Financial stress
* Relationship difficulties

Nutritional Treatments for Emotional Overeating

It may seem ironic to turn to nutritional treatments for emotional overeating – after all, isn’t the problem too much eating?

Why would you want to look at more foods you need to eat? But more and more experts are seeing the connection between nutrition and emotional overeating.

The fact is, when you overeat in response to emotions, you may not be eating the healthiest foods. You become full – even sick – on junk foods, and there’s no room left for the good stuff.

It’s common knowledge that you do need the right nutrients to be healthy, and if those foods are not being eaten, then it’s more a matter of quality than quantity.

Nutritional Deficiencies

Another aspect of emotional overeating may be nutritional deficiencies – and the deficiencies might bring on cravings.

The theory is that the body craves certain foods in response to a need – in the case of emotional overeating, the need is emotional but it may also be physical.

For example, a craving for ice cream may signify your body’s need for calcium.

Here are some vitamins and minerals that, according to research, are implicated in the management of emotional overeating.

# Vitamin D

This vitamin’s effect on mood is well-documented, and is even suggested for people who suffer from certain depressive disorders, such as Seasonal Affective Disorder. Foods high in Vitamin D include:

* Cod liver oil
* Sockeye salmon
* Soymilk (fortified with Vitamin D)
* Cow’s milk

Remember that Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, so sources with healthy fats, such as fish, may be absorbed better by the body.

# B-complex Vitamins

These important vitamins help increase energy levels and manage water retention. Foods with B vitamins include:

* Yogurt
* Eggs
* Lean beef (B12)
* Dark leafy greens (kale, broccoli, spinach)

# Magnesium and Calcium

This is a powerful pair – many supplements put them together in one pill or capsule. These minerals are important for managing muscle and nerve tension.

Interestingly, when these minerals occur naturally in foods, there is usually a higher proportion of magnesium to calcium, whereas supplements generally have more calcium than magnesium. Foods include:

* Beans
* Nuts, especially peanuts, hazelnuts, and pecans
* Corn

# Zinc

Zinc has been shown to have a profound effect on appetite and cravings, and many people with eating disorders are deficient in this mineral. Zinc is found in the following foods:

* Shellfish, especially oysters and crab
* Beef, particularly beef shanks
* Pork
* Chicken
* Garbanzo beans

Making deliberate, conscious choices about what you do eat can go a long way toward managing emotional overeating. Plan your meals and make a shopping list, and be proactive about meeting your nutritional needs.

 

Lifestyle Choices: Learn to Overcome Emotional Overeating

Overcoming emotional overeating can seem overwhelming, and setbacks can be expected.

But the good news is, there are lifestyle choices that you can make to help overcome this problem. The key word is choice – you can choose to follow a healthy lifestyle.

Sometimes it helps to break things down into small, specific steps you can take (just trying to lead a “healthier lifestyle” is a bit vague!). Following are some of these specifics. And remember, setbacks and relapses are not unusual.
Don’t beat yourself up; just start fresh tomorrow.

Exercise

Experts are in general agreement that regular exercise three to five days a week is most beneficial. This exercise should consist of at least 20 minutes of cardiovascular exercise (such as vigorous walking, jogging, biking, etc.) followed by some light toning or weight training. Committing to this regimen full-force is not necessarily the best way to go; if you can only exercise once or twice a week, that’s still better than nothing and will hopefully pave the way for more in the future.

Exercise is said to relieve emotional overeating in several ways. For one, exercise produces endorphins which are the body’s natural “feel good” hormones. For another, exercise prevents boredom and mindless eating, which is what you might be doing if you weren’t exercising! And finally, exercise will likely boost your self-image, helping to break the cycle of low self-esteem and poor self-image that “feeds” emotional overeating disorder.

Nature

Never underestimate the healing power of nature! For those with emotional overeating disorder, choosing to spend more time out in nature can be particularly beneficial. After all, in the natural realm there are no media messages to mess with your self-image, and being in nature connects you to your origins and the origins of food.
Some experts theorize that detachment from food and its natural source plays a role in emotional overeating disorder. Getting involved in nature and exploring and appreciating it can go a long way toward reconnecting with our biologically normal view of food. Maybe you can kill two birds with one stone and do your regular exercise outdoors!

 

Tips on Overcoming Emotional Overeating

Emotional overeating is almost a joke in our society – movies, TV shows, and the resulting stereotypes cause many of us to laugh about how much ice cream it takes to get over a boyfriend, or how much chocolate we need to overcome rejection. But for those who actually suffer from emotional overeating, it’s anything but funny.

First, it helps to be honest with yourself and identify if you have this problem or not. Here are some tips to help you know if you are an emotional overeater or not.

1. Keep a food diary. In this diary, in addition to noting everything you eat, also note how you feel when you eat – sad, angry, upset, elated, joyful, etc. Don’t judge yourself or make any changes to your habits when you begin keeping this diary; you’re not trying to impress anyone or prove anything. You are trying to get an honest picture of your eating habits. After several weeks, a pattern will probably emerge.

2. Are you under a lot of stress? Do you find that you gain weight when under stress? There are other factors that can come into play, of course, causing you to gain weight. But this is something to consider if you are trying to figure out if you have an emotional overeating problem or not.

3. Get advice from a therapist or specialist if you really want to find out if you are a victim of emotional overeating.

How Can It Be Overcome?

If you have identified emotional overeating as something you suffer from, you may benefit from some tips on overcoming this problem. Here are some to consider.

1. Seek stress relief

If you overeat in response to stress, it makes sense to find alternative ways to relieve and manage that stress. Meditation, Yoga, Pilates, martial arts, and other regular forms of exercise and relaxation techniques can help alleviate the stress that is triggering your overeating.

2. Swap goodies for goodies

Try to find substitutions for the comfort foods or food rewards you seek when you are feeling positive or negative emotions. Having something in place already is key – keep a list handy or other reminder that will prompt you to turn to the alternative rather than the candy bar. (Some alone time, a short walk, reading a magazine or book for pleasure, doing your nails, etc. are all little emotional pick-me-ups that you can implement in place of food.)

3. Why am I doing this?

Before eating, ask yourself why you are doing it. Do you feel genuinely hungry? If you’re truly hungry, you may feel fatigued and, of course, feel hunger in your stomach. Ask yourself if you really feel hungry or if you are seeking an energy boost or a calming effect instead.

 

Could Your Weight Gain Be the Result of Emotional Overeating?

Weight gain is frustrating enough, but when you can’t seem to identify the cause(s) of it, the frustration is compounded. Emotional overeating is a somewhat sneaky problem – because it can involve mindless eating, it’s the sort of thing that can occur without you realizing it. If you are having trouble figuring out what’s causing your weight gain, here are some tips on identifying emotional overeating (as opposed to just overeating).

Seemingly Unexplainable Weight Gain

If you are gaining weight and you can’t seem to figure out why, this is (ironically) a sign that the problem may lie with emotional overeating. As noted above, you often don’t know you’re doing it when it comes to emotional overeating. You may even be working out regularly and preparing healthy meals and still gaining weight, because you are mindlessly eating other foods when you feel negative emotions.

A Sudden Urge

Sources say that emotional “hunger” comes on quite suddenly, perhaps in the form of an irresistible craving for a certain food or just the urge to eat right now. True hunger is usually more gradual than that – unless you have low blood sugar or have gone a very long time without eating, true hunger does not usually take the form of an urgent need to eat a whole lot right away.

Depression

More and more the connection between emotional overeating and depression is being discovered. Do you feel depressed periodically? When you even think of feeling depressed, what goes through your mind? How do you cope? If you are picturing a big serving of your favorite comfort food, then this may be a sign that your overeating is emotion-based.

Stress

Are you going through a stressful time in your life simultaneous to your weight gain? Have you seen that pattern before? Stress, with its accompanying anxiety and other negative feelings, can trigger someone to overeat in response to those feelings.

Guilt

How do you feel after you eat? Are you consumed with guilt? Do you feel ashamed? These feelings are signs that you have a problem with emotional overeating. Normal eating to satisfy normal hunger does not make a person feel guilty.

Specific Cravings

As many parents know, genuine hunger usually means that you’re more open to various food options. In emotional overeating, though, cravings may be so specific that no other food will do to satisfy your “hunger.” You feel like you have to have that particular food to feel satisfied.

 

Weight Loss Surgery: Can It Help with Emotional Overeating?

If you have trouble with emotional overeating, you may have considered weight loss surgery of some sort. But how do you know if it’s for you? What kinds of surgery options are available? Here are some ideas as to the more common surgical options currently available and some of the better-known pros and cons associated with them.

1. Lap-Band

This is a type of restrictive weight loss surgery, and it is adjustable. A silicon doughnut or ring is placed around the top of the stomach, leaving a small pouch above the ring. This is where the food goes first, and the pouch, being so small, fills up quickly. The person feels full on less food, in other words. Slowly, the food makes its way from the pouch into the main stomach.

The doctor or surgeon may, from time to time, inject saline into the ring in order to inflate it, thus decreasing the pouch’s capacity even further. The opposite can be done as well.

Pros:

* It’s adjustable, as noted above – fluid can be removed or injected into the ring.
* The digestive process is not compromised; food is digested “the usual way.”
* The surgical procedure is usually done laproscopically, meaning it’s minimally invasive.

Cons:

* Additional surgery may be required in the case of twisting of the access port or perforation of the stomach.
* Weight loss tends to be rather slow and gradual, and not as dramatic as some other options.
* Repeated follow-up visits with your doctor are required.

2. Gastric Bypass

This is what’s known as a malabsorptive technique. In gastric bypass surgery, a small pouch is created at the top of the stomach using “staples” rather than a ring. Then part of the small intestine is re-routed to connect to this pouch, essentially creating a permanently smaller stomach. It is called “bypass” surgery because food bypasses the rest of the stomach and the original small intestine connection, called the duodenum.

Pros:

* Weight loss tends to be significant and permanent.
* Mild side effects, such as heartburn, tend to be resolved easily.

Cons:

* Compromised nutrient absorption is a significant concern, and patients are generally required to take many supplements to prevent nutritional deficiency.
* Dumping syndrome, or a too-fast emptying of stomach contents, is a potentially difficult side effect.
* It’s harder for doctors to view the stomach and intestine via endoscopy, meaning cancer and other problems may go undetected.

These are just two of the more common types of weight loss surgery. The bottom line is, weight loss surgery can help with the weight gain and excessive caloric intake associated with emotional overeating, but it does not address the underlying emotional issues. If you do choose some sort of surgery to treat emotional overeating, it’s a good idea to make sure it’s part of a “whole person” treatment plan that includes counseling and emotional therapy.

 

Emotional Overeating: Knowing Where to Turn

Emotional overeating can seem like a prison with no way out, and when you do think of seeking treatment, it can seem too overwhelming to consider. Sometimes it helps to have some simple steps and treatment programs laid out clearly, so it doesn’t seem so overwhelming. Following is a list of common treatment options for emotional overeating disorder, as well as some tips on things you can do and some cautions on what not to do.

Common Treatments

First, recognize your problem. Know you’re not alone – the number of people who suffer from emotional overeating disorder is significant.

* Counseling – Individual, group, or family counseling can prove very helpful for people who experience emotional overeating. Counseling treatment usually involves some nutritional and dietary guidelines and treatment of underlying emotional problems.

* Surgery – This is a somewhat controversial treatment for emotional overeating – it addresses the physical aspect of the problem rather than the emotional. However, in combination with emotional therapy and extensive medical counseling, surgery is a viable choice for some sufferers. Usually, surgical options involve decreasing the space available in the stomach, usually by a lap-band or gastric bypass procedure.

* Medication – Under the care of a professional, medications – usually anti-depressants – have been shown to provide relief for many who suffer from emotional overeating. This may be due to the suspected connection between overeating and depression – research continues to point to the relationship between the two problems.

Tips – What You Can Do

* Exercise regularly – Yes, you’ve heard this one, but it’s really an important aspect of managing emotional overeating. Exercise may improve mood, improve energy levels, and increase your self-image – all part of overcoming emotional overeating. You can start with just 20 minutes of brisk walking three to six times a week.

* Eat well – What you do eat is as important as what you’re “not allowed” to eat! Sometimes, emotional overeaters can be overcome by cravings for certain “forbidden” foods, like ice cream, candy bars, and potato chips. But if you’re full of and surrounded by healthy foods, you can dig in without feeling guilty. Keep fresh produce on hand and eat lots of lean protein, veggies, fruits, and whole grains.

What Not to Do

* Keep unhealthy snacks handy – If you don’t have the unhealthy food in the house, you will probably be less likely to head for it in times of emotional distress. In other words, make it hard on yourself to get the foods you want to eat when feeling bad – cross ice cream, junk foods, and fatty snacks off your grocery list.

* Crash diet – Trying to starve yourself or go on an extended fast is not recommended. You may compromise yourself nutritionally and/or physically, and crash dieting tends to result in more overeating afterward.

 

Alternative Therapies for Emotional Overeating

Emotional overeating can make a person feel imprisoned – it can seem like there is no way out of the cycle of feeling sad, angry, anxious and so forth, and then eating to alleviate the emotional pain. There are treatments that are available, though – some of them conventional and some of them alternative.

Conventional therapy, surgery, and medication have all been utilized at one time or another for the treatment of emotional overeating. There are, however, some alternative therapies that are worth exploring. Here are some of them.

Hypnosis

Because emotional overeating begins in the mind, hypnosis is said to be effective because it addresses the mind directly with the power of suggestion. Hypnosis is not the mumbo-jumbo stuff of cartoons and swinging pocket watches; it’s a clinical practice and many practitioners have used it with success to treat emotional overeating.

Meditation

The intent of meditation as a treatment for emotional overeating is to “tune in” to the emotional thought center that is driving your cravings and/or binge eating. Meditation, sometimes taking a form called “mindfulness,” is the opposite of mindLESSness, which is what often happens in emotional overeating. The person does not really think about what he or she is doing; it’s mindless eating.

Herbal Supplements

It seems like every time you turn around there’s a new herbal supplement promising to help you lose weight. But there are some herbs that can help with the issue of emotional overeating. Here are some of them.

* Hoodia – This much-publicized herb is said to be effective at appetite suppression and boosting energy. Its effects tend to be subtle, and it also has a good safety record.

* Vitex – This hormone-balancing herb for women may help those whose emotional overeating is influenced by hormone fluctuations.

* Ginseng – This ancient herb is said to help sugar cravings and curb the compulsion to overeat in response to one’s emotions. Both American and Asian ginseng are purported to be equally effective.

Acupuncture

Acupuncturists are often asked if acupuncture can help with weight loss. The answer, in general, is yes – but not always. However, the good news is that acupuncture tends to be more successful with treating emotional overeating than just overeating. This may be due to acupuncture’s alleged ability to release endorphins and boost metabolism – making the client feel better emotionally, effectively curtailing the emotional overeating.

Nutrition

Interestingly, having the right balance of vitamins and minerals may affect emotional overeating – it’s not too much of a stretch to speculate that nutritional deficiencies could play a part in this kind of overeating. So make sure you’re not eating a lot of artificial, processed, pre-packaged foods; opt for fresh, whole foods as a general rule. It’s also a good idea to take a vitamin and mineral supplement that is formulated for your gender and life situation.

 

How to Eat to Stop Emotional Overeating

When you think of stopping emotional overeating, does it seem like an impossible goal? You’re not alone – many people who suffer from this problem feel imprisoned and helpless. It can seem like you are unable to break free from the overwhelming emotions and habits. But there’s good news – it’s a treatable problem.

Being honest with yourself is an important first step. Emotional overeaters tend to judge themselves pretty harshly, but don’t – you’re not an isolated case or some kind of freak. It’s a sign of strength to seek help! It means you’ve identified the problem.

If you’re struggling with this problem, there are some things you can do to get things under control while you’re seeking professional help. Here are some tips.

Your Grocery List

When an emotional moment hits and you head for the refrigerator or pantry, what kind of foods do you usually go for? Often, emotional overeaters head for high-calorie comfort foods like ice cream, chips, or candy bars. But you can’t eat those things if they are not in your house! Here are some examples of foods to put on your grocery list in place of the ones you may be tempted to buy. (Another tip – buy only the foods on your list. Compulsive buying of food is tempting.)

* Brown rice (instead of white rice)
* Millet (instead of or in addition to rice)
* Fresh fruits and vegetables (rather than canned)
* Low-fat, low-calorie yogurt (rather than ice cream)
* Popcorn kernels for air popping (rather than chips and fatty snacks)
* Lean protein like fish, turkey, and chicken (instead of deli meats and processed meats like hotdogs and bologna)
* Natural, healthy cooking oils like olive and safflower oil (instead of shortening, lard, or unhealthy oils)

Don’t Crash Diet

It’s good to be proactive in solving problems, and emotional eating is no exception. If you try to crash diet, you may find yourself eating more after the crash diet is over. So, rather than stopping eating everything you love, try some of these tips.

* Allow yourself to have a dish of frozen yogurt each week as a treat. This approach tends to be easier than just cutting out all frozen treats. You could use this approach with other “naughty” foods, too – it may be easier to resist if you know you are going to have that food on Saturday (or whatever day of the week you choose to have a small treat).

* Boost your nutrition with a good quality vitamin and mineral supplement.

* Increase your consumption of nutrient-dense foods.

Eat Regular Meals

Experts recommend regular mealtimes as a way to combat emotional overeating. If it’s not “time” for food, then you may be better able to hold off on eating until it is time. Also, eating regular meals helps you to be deliberate about your intake of nutritious foods. And finally, having regular meal times tends to make for a more relaxed eating experience, which is the direct opposite of anxiety-driven overeating.

Article on zinc and eating disorder Anorexia

https://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Article/2021/10/14/Clinician-argues-zinc-supplementation-key-to-reversing-eating-disorders

 

Categories Fitness, Videos, Weight Loss

The Foolproof Diet Video Course

With this video course you are going to find out how to have consistent effort that makes it possible to actually lose weight and stay on the proper diet plan.

You will learn how to begin to lose weight and provide yourself with the sustenance that you need to thrive.

You are going to find all the information that you need in order to begin changing your life, starting right now.

Topics covered:

  • Tracking Your Current Diet
  • Starting a Food Journal
  • Getting Rid of Problem Foods
  • Slow and Steady Wins the Race
  • Combining Exercise for Best Results
  • Creating a Calorie Deficit for Weight Loss
  • Introducing Fruits and Vegetables for Weight Loss
  • The Importance of Drinking Water for Weight Loss
  • Lean Meats and Healthy Protein Sources
  • Planning Meals and Other Tips and Tricks

Categories Diet, eBooks, Stress, Weight Loss

Eat Your Way To Calm To Combat Stress

Discover a Diet and Lifestyle That Combats Stress So You Can Life A Healthier, Calmer And Longer Life! You’ll Find Out The Tips, Techniques And Exact Steps To Take To Finally Get The Results You Deserve!

Stress. It’s a normal part of human life that increases and de-creases depending on what’s going on in our personal, profes-sional, or academic lives at specific times.

Although at some point each of us will feel stressed about something, some people are affected more by stress than others. If left unchecked, stress can sometimes turn into further problems, such as anxiety or depres-sion.

Because of this, understanding how to prevent, manage and control your stress with your diet and your lifestyle is absolutely important.

Since stress can have such a huge effect on your life if left to worsen, understanding how what you put into your body can help your mental state is absolutely vital to living a life that is calm, relaxing and stress-free.

Since trying to ignore your stress won’t make it go away, it’s im-portant to know exactly what to do in order to help your stress levels remain manageable and easy to control.

One of the best ways to take control of the amount of stress which you are feeling is to take control of your diet, exercise and lifestyle habits.

When your diet and lifestyle are working together in your favor to combat and fight stress, you will find that you are better able to control any feelings of worry or anxiety that come up.

Remember that what you put into your body isn’t just important for your physical health, but also for your mental health, too!

Eat Your Way To Calm
Categories Diet, Fitness, Videos, Weight Loss

Total Body Weight Transformation

How Would You Like To Burn Fat And Build Muscle Even Faster Without Ever Stepping Foot Into A Gym?

Do you want to get into the best shape of your life? Have you tried and failed to get into great shape in the past?

Do you struggle with training programs that involve going to the gym 5 days a week for an hour at a time and starving yourself of carbs and other tasty foods?

Bodyweight training is the perfect solution when it comes to building muscle, losing weight, getting fitter and improving health all round.

This is the answer that has been staring you in the face all this time and it can work where so many other methods have failed in the past for a number of key reasons.

Categories Mental health, Weight Loss

Emotional Overeating?

Could Your Weight Gain Be the Result of Emotional Overeating?

Weight gain is frustrating enough, but when you can’t seem to identify the cause(s) of it, the frustration is compounded. Emotional overeating is a somewhat sneaky problem – because it can involve mindless eating, it’s the sort of thing that can occur without you realizing it. If you are having trouble figuring out what’s causing your weight gain, here are some tips on identifying emotional overeating (as opposed to just overeating).

Seemingly Unexplainable Weight Gain

If you are gaining weight and you can’t seem to figure out why, this is (ironically) a sign that the problem may lie with emotional overeating. As noted above, you often don’t know you’re doing it when it comes to emotional overeating. You may even be working out regularly and preparing healthy meals and still gaining weight, because you are mindlessly eating other foods when you feel negative emotions.

A Sudden Urge

Sources say that emotional “hunger” comes on quite suddenly, perhaps in the form of an irresistible craving for a certain food or just the urge to eat right now. True hunger is usually more gradual than that – unless you have low blood sugar or have gone a very long time without eating, true hunger does not usually take the form of an urgent need to eat a whole lot right away.

Depression

More and more the connection between emotional overeating and depression is being discovered. Do you feel depressed periodically? When you even think of feeling depressed, what goes through your mind? How do you cope? If you are picturing a big serving of your favorite comfort food, then this may be a sign that your overeating is emotion-based.

Stress

Are you going through a stressful time in your life simultaneous to your weight gain? Have you seen that pattern before? Stress, with its accompanying anxiety and other negative feelings, can trigger someone to overeat in response to those feelings.

Stress contributes to one of the most dangerous and growing conditions in North America, namely, obesity. In a society where 65 percent of people are overweight and 31 per cent are clinically obese, chronic stimulation of the HPA axis can be viewed as one of the most dangerous risk factors for our health.

Cortisol inhibits the release of leptin, the hormone that reduces our appetite after a meal, and “jump-starts” your metabolism.

It also increases the release of insulin in response to carbohydrate load, promoting fat storage, particularly in the abdominal region where white fat cells have three times the number of cortisol receptors on their surface.

To make matters worse CRH and cortisol block the production and binding of both serotonin and dopamine. This combination of imbalanced hormones destabilizes mood and stimulates food cravings.

Stress, via cortisol, also increases the physical craving for carbohydrates. Cortisol production triggers the release of a brain chemical called neuropeptide Y, which causes the desire for carbohydrate consumption.

** This biochemical mechanism is the reason that many people overeat sweets and starchy foods when they are under stress. **

Guilt

How do you feel after you eat? Are you consumed with guilt? Do you feel ashamed? These feelings are signs that you have a problem with emotional overeating. Normal eating to satisfy normal hunger does not make a person feel guilty.

Specific Cravings

As many parents know, genuine hunger usually means that you’re more open to various food options. In emotional overeating, though, cravings may be so specific that no other food will do to satisfy your “hunger.” You feel like you have to have that particular food to feel satisfied.

High Histamine

Visit our page on mental health to read about how having high histamine can cause food addictions.

Categories Health, Weight Loss

Top Tips That Will Make Eating Healthily Easier

Top Tips That Will Make Eating Healthily Easier

If you want to lose weight, then you need to start eating less and more healthily. Many of us are not the size we want to be and the primary reason for that is that we eat too much and we eat too much of the wrong things.

The problem is that it isn’t as easy to fix your diet as you might initially expect. Eating right means that you need the money to spend on fruits and vegetables (that tend to go off in no time at all) and you need the time to prepare all the food and clean up afterward.

If you’re going to start eating healthier then, the smart thing to do is to think ahead and to make this as easy as possible so that you don’t get caught out by a lack of time, motivation or space. Here are some ways to do that…

Get the Right Appliances

If you want to make cooking in the kitchen easier, then there are a ton of appliances and gadgets that can help you to do just that.

A great example is a blender or a food processor. This can be used to mix fruits into a smoothie, or to mix vegetables into a soup.

Either way, this will give you a ton of highly beneficial nutrients in an easy-to-eat form factor that will only take a few minutes to prepare.

Another good example is a dishwasher. This will wash up your plates and dishes for you after you’ve eaten, meaning you’ll need to spend less time washing up after you have finished and can spend more time cooking and preparing your food as a result.

Learn the Right Recipes

Of course being able to cook quickly also comes down to having the right recipes. This is why it’s very much spending some time to learn meals that are quick and easy to prepare while still containing lots of highly beneficial nutrients and being low calorie.

Cook in Bulk

Common advice is to cook at the start of the week and then simply heat it up to eat during the week. This is a nice idea but the reality is that most of us don’t want to give up an entire Sunday to cooking.

A better solution then will often be to cook at the usual time but to prepare larger batches. This way, you’ll have spare food that you can enjoy on other evenings.

You can even freeze some for further in the future. Crucially, this process doesn’t take any longer than cooking the usual portions.

Eat Consistently

One particularly important tip is to try and eat more consistently during the day. That means eating a relatively samey breakfast and lunch. While this isn’t as exciting as eating fresh and original meals every day, you’ll still have the evening to do that.

For breakfast and lunch though, you’ll now be able to get your food faster without having to count calories or learn new recipes.

Stress and carbohydrates

Stress contributes to one of the most dangerous and growing conditions in North America, namely, obesity. In a society where 65 percent of people are overweight and 31 per cent are clinically obese, chronic stimulation of the HPA axis can be viewed as one of the most dangerous risk factors for our health. Cortisol inhibits the release of leptin, the hormone that reduces our appetite after a meal, and “jump-starts” your metabolism.

It also increases the release of insulin in response to carbohydrate load, promoting fat storage, particularly in the abdominal region where white fat cells have three times the number of cortisol receptors on their surface. To make matters worse CRH and cortisol block the production and binding of both serotonin and dopamine. This combination of imbalanced hormones destabilizes mood and stimulates food cravings.

Stress, via cortisol, also increases the physical craving for carbohydrates. Cortisol production triggers the release of a brain chemical called neuropeptide Y, which causes the desire for carbohydrate consumption. This biochemical mechanism is the reason that many people overeat sweets and starchy foods when they are under stress.

So seeking ways to lower your stress levels will help you to eat much better.  Visit our page on mental health

Walking fo r weight loss
Categories Weight Loss

The Positive Weight Loss Approach

TOP REASONS OF OBESITY

  1. High Histamine Levels
  2. DRD2 A1 allele gene

Once you have made up your mind to lose weight, you should make that commitment and go into it with a positive attitude. We all
know that losing weight can be quite a challenge.

In fact, for some, it can be downright tough. It takes time, practice and support to  change lifetime habits.

But it’s a process you must learn in order to succeed.  You and you alone are the one who has the power to lose unwanted pounds.

Think like a winner, and not a loser – – remember that emotions are like muscles and the ones you use most grow the strongest.
If you always look at the negative side of things, you’ll become a downbeat, pessimistic person. Even slightly negative thoughts
have a greater impact on you and last longer than powerful positive thoughts.

Negative thinking doesn’t do you any good, it just holds you back from accomplishing the things you want to do. When a negative
thought creeps into your mind, replace it reminding yourself that you’re somebody, you have self-worth and you possess unique
strengths and talents.

Contemplate what lies ahead of you. Losing weight is not just about diets. It’s about a whole new you and the possibility of
creating a new life for yourself. Investigate the weight loss programs that appeal to you and that you feel will teach you the
behavioral skills you need to stick with throughout the weight- loss process.

First you should look for support among family and friends. It can be an enormous help to discuss obstacles and share skills and
tactics with others on the same path. You might look for this support from others you know who are in weight loss programs and
you can seek guidance from someone you know who has lost weight and kept it off.

There are success stories across the country today. On television and in newspapers, magazines and tabloids about people who have
miraculously lost untold pounds and kept it off. In all instances they say their mental attitude as well as their outlook on life
has totally changed.

Diets and weight loss programs are more flexible now than they once were and there are many prepared foods already portioned out. They
are made attractive and can be prepared in a matter of minutes. Low- fat and low-calorie foods are on shelves everywhere.

You will probably need to learn new, wiser eating skills. You will want a weight loss regimen that gives you some control, rather than
imposing one rigid system. Look for one that offers a variety of different eating plans, so you can choose the one that’s best for you.

Keep in mind, too, that your weight loss program will most likely include some physical exercises. Look at the exercising aspect
of your program as fun and recreation and not as a form of grueling and sweaty work.

The fact is that physical fitness is linked inseparable to all personal effectiveness in every field. Anyone
willing to take the few simple steps that lie between them and fitness will shortly begin to feel better, and the improvement will
reflect itself in every facet of their existence.

Doctors now say that walking is one of the best exercises. It helps the total circulation of blood throughout the body, and thus has a
direct effect on your overall feeling of health. There are things such as aerobics, jogging, swimming and many other exercises which
will benefit a weight loss program. Discuss the options with your doctor and take his advice in planning your exercise and weight loss
program.

Categories Diet, Weight Loss

Eating Bread Causes Bloating and Other Digestive Problems

Eating Bread Causes Bloating and Other Digestive Problems

Do you or a member of your family experience bloating after eating bread? If you answered yes, then it is possible that you are sensitive to foods made from wheat. It is also quite probable that bread is such a regular part of your diet that you can’t imagine doing without it.

The simple sandwich is a staple for most families. However, if you want the symptoms to stop you have to eliminate the cause. You can either reduce your bread intake or look for other (gluten-free) types of bread.

If symptoms persist you may need to further limit or cease your intake of other wheat-based food also. As most bread is cooked from wheat flour a sensitivity to wheat will result in discomfort. An allergy may produce even harsher symptoms.

Wheat Allergy

If you are allergic to wheat you may experience itching, rashes, wheezing and your tongue and lips swelling within minutes of eating wheat bread. You must consult your doctor right away if you experience symptoms this severe.

Wheat Sensitivity

If you are sensitive to wheat you may experience bloating, stomach cramps, or diarrhea hours after eating wheat food products. In milder cases you may experience abdominal discomfort, especially after consuming a large serving.

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease occurs is an extreme form of gluten intolerance. This is a condition in which an individual’s intestine becomes damaged by a protein in the gluten. While affected, the intestines are unable to perform their proper function of nutrient absorption and excretion. If you suspect yourself to be gluten intolerant, consult a doctor and expect to undergo blood testing for an accurate diagnosis.

Avoiding wheat-based foods

Many people who are either sensitive or allergic to wheat products have made the choice to abstain from wheat-based foods and have found relief from their symptoms. Cases of wheat sensitivity are increasingly common especially as bread has now become part of a staple diet of many people and cultures.

What should you do if you are suffering from bloating and other stomach problems after eating food products that contain wheat? If your symptoms of wheat allergy persist for a longer period of time, or if blood is observed in your stool then you should seek medical help right away.

Any other serious symptoms such as vomiting and severe stomach cramps should also be referred to a doctor. If your symptoms are mild or if you are suffering from a bloated stomach, you can try an elimination diet. You can do this by avoiding foods made from wheat for at least a month.

If your symptoms cease, then wheat is almost certainly the culprit. Resume eating wheat products in small quantities to check if your symptoms recur. Do not start on bread immediately. Try pasta first for a couple of days before you choose to eat wheat bread again.

Monitor the after-effects of any food containing wheat. Do not overload your system. If you have a wheat sensitivity rather than an allergy you may be able to continue to eat wheat products in moderation. If this is the case, overloading your digestive system with wheat foods will cause any discomforting symptoms to return.

Aside from bread, other foods that can contain wheat include cereals, doughnuts, beer, soy sauce, biscuits, pastries and cakes. Make a point of reading food labels. If you choose to go on a wheat-free diet, alternatives are quinoa, buckwheat pasta, porridge, cornflakes and rice cereals. Some people who are sensitive to wheat may find the FODMAP diet helpful. This diet allows people to cut out fermentable foods that may lead to bloating and diarrhea.

Categories Health, Weight Loss

Juice Fasting for Weight Loss

Juice Fasting for Weight Loss

Traditionally juice diets have been used for detoxification purposes. The principles behind this are straightforward and do make sense, but are only designed for a short period of 2-3 days maximum (often called a juice fast).

By only consuming fresh juices for a period of time you naturally abstain from fats, processed carbohydrates and refined sugars as well as substances like coffee and alcohol.

As a result, this is extremely beneficial for cleansing the liver and kidneys and their related systems, including the whole digestive tract. It is believed too that by giving the digestive system a ‘rest’ from fiber; digestion is easier, and nutrients are able to be absorbed more efficiently.

Recently many bold claims have been made about prolonged juice fasting, such as disease fighting, free radical destroying, fat burning and pain alleviating results. However, many of these claims are as yet to be supported by any reliable research.

Juice Fasting is Not a Long-term Solution to Weight Loss

Juice fasting exclusively as a weight loss measure is a short-term solution for a long term problem that can in some situations result in unwanted complications.

The term ‘juicing’ pretty much means drinking your food, primarily fruits, vegetables and herbs. Incorporated into a healthy diet juicing is a great way to boost energy levels and consume extra nutrients – a popular favorite is beetroot, celery, carrot, apple, ginger and mint; perfect for a morning ‘pick me up’.

Weight will certainly be lost when ‘juicing’ however it is not guaranteed that any actual fat will be burnt. Instead you even risk losing muscle mass due to the absence of protein in the diet. You also run the risk of slowing your metabolism, meaning when you resume a normal diet, less energy will be burnt and potentially more fat will be stored immediately following the ‘juice fasting’ period.

These problems may be combatted by consuming juice more frequently (every 2-3 hours) and balancing your juices by adding protein, either in the form of powder supplements or natural sources such as almond milk or Greek yogurt.

High-carb and High-calorie

Juices can also be surprisingly calorie dense, especially when predominantly fruit. This is due to their high carbohydrate content. The actual process of juicing fruit and vegetables can also remove some of their natural benefits; of particular concern is the absence of fiber. Once the physical bulk, largely fiber, is removed, the remaining sugars form a much larger percentage of what remains.

If viewed as a short-term revitalizing and cleansing fast, juicing can be an extremely positive part of a healthy lifestyle, especially when combined with a balanced diet and regular physical exercise. As a long-term weight loss solution, however, it is a fad diet that cannot and should not be sustained for long periods.

Initial dramatic weight loss may indeed occur, however little will be done for long-term weight maintenance.

If you do decide to try a juice fast you should consult your healthcare professional first and discuss any individual potential risks. Juicing is not recommended for people suffering diabetes and heart disease nor is it suitable for pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Always include a wide selection of fruits and vegetables, washed thoroughly before use and where possible choose organic produce to eliminate concentrated consumption of pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers (particularly in leafy greens).

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