Healthy Eating
Categories Diet, Videos, Weight Loss

Healthy Eating Video Course

With this video course you are going to understand the importance of eating healthy and how food impacts our bodies and functions. Without understanding exactly why our bodies react to food the way they do, it can sometimes be difficult to stay on track.

But there are many ways that you can begin to understand why eating healthy foods is so important, and exactly how to begin on a healthy eating journey. Let’s not waste any more time. We should begin eating healthy today!

Topics covered:

Why Eat Healthy?
Understanding Your Relationship with Food
The Dangers of Diet Trends
The Food Pyramid
How Food Can Be Your Medicine
The Health Benefits of Eating Vegetables
The Health Benefits of Eating Fruits
The Best Meat to Eat for Healthy Living
The Dangers of Processed Foods
Bringing It All Together with Meal Planning

 

 

Emotional over eating
Categories Diet, Weight Loss

How to Stop Emotional Over Eating

Emotional overeating disorders can be difficult and devastating for those who suffer from them. What makes this happen?

Why is it that some people, knowingly or unknowingly, turn to food for comfort? Here are some thoughts and ideas on those questions.

Emotional overeating disorder is a general term that refers to any of various eating habits where genuine hunger is not the motivational factor.

It is more common among women than men, but men are not immune – especially young men in their teens and twenties.

Those who suffer from this disorder associate food with emotional comfort, and will turn to eating to escape negative feelings.

Past Trauma. For some with emotional overeating disorder, the problem stems from past traumatic events.

Someone who suffered sexual abuse, for example, or some other kind of sexual trauma may overeat in response to feelings of anxiety and confusion.

The result is a fatter body, which some sources suggest may cause the sufferer to feel ‘protected’ from being attractive to the opposite sex.

Subconsciously or consciously, the sufferer wants to be unattractive. Other examples of past trauma or unmet needs may cause a person to turn to emotional overeating.

Poor Self-Image. People who suffer from low self-esteem and a negative self-image may seek escape by overeating.

In a way, emotional overeating is a physical expression of what the sufferer feels inside, and the resulting weight projects the same image of self-disrespect.

Self-Medication. Like alcoholics, those who struggle with emotional overeating may be unconsciously using food as a drug. Eating numbs or dulls the emotions that might be too hard to deal with otherwise.

Depression. Studies indicate a strong correlation between depression and emotional overeating. Ironically, sometimes as depression grows worse a sufferer loses weight; weight loss means the sufferer is not eating as much, and therefore not engaging in his or her coping mechanism.

Stress. Prolonged, unrelieved stress can have a profound effect on the body. Stress stimulates the body to produce, among other chemicals, the hormone cortisol.

Cortisol apparently has a hunger-stimulating effect, and as the stressful emotions increase along with the cortisol, a cycle of emotional eating can play out. 

Stress, via cortisol, also increases the physical craving for carbohydrates. Cortisol production triggers the release of a brain chemical called neuropeptide Y, which causes the desire for carbohydrate consumption.

 

Could You Have an Eating Disorder?

Do you find yourself gaining weight during times of stress? Do you fear boredom because you know you’ll simply eat to fill the time?

These are just some of the symptoms of emotional overeating. If you think you may suffer from this relatively common eating disorder, here are some signs and symptoms that may help you identify whether or not this is what you’re struggling with.

Mindless Eating

If you have a binge eating disorder or emotional overeating problem, you may stuff food in and not even really taste it or realize what you’re doing. It’s as though you are “out of it” and just mindlessly stuffing food into your mouth.

Feelings of Guilt and Shame

Many people with emotional overeating disorders feel really embarrassed and hateful of themselves after they’ve got through with an eating binge.

The problem, of course, is that these negative feelings may make you reach for more food for comfort.

Eating in Secret

Because of being embarrassed, may emotional overeaters will eat in private, reserving their “naughty” foods for when no one is looking.

Always on My Mind…

Do you think about food all the time? Do you feel anxious about the prospect of leaving the house without snacks or money to buy food?

Constantly thinking about food (food obsession) may be a sign that you have an emotional overeating disorder.

Feeling Sick

Sometimes, emotional overeaters will eat and eat to comfort themselves, and then feel sick afterward.

Obviously, this is your body’s way of telling you you’ve eaten far too much more than is good for you; but for emotional overeaters, this sickness does not necessarily deter the next binge.

Identify Your Triggers

Emotional overeating is usually triggered by something – emotions, yes, but sometimes we need to be more specific than that.

Identifying your personal triggers can go a long way toward helping you overcome the disorder. Basic trigger categories include:

* Emotional – Eating to relieve boredom, stress, or anxiety

* Psychological – You may eat in response to negative, self-destructive thoughts

* Environmental/Situational – You may eat simply because the opportunity is there. Also in this category is the habit of eating while doing another activity, such as reading or watching TV.

Do any of these signs and symptoms describe you? If so, don’t despair – there are treatment options available for emotional overeaters.

Check with your healthcare provider for advice on therapists or specialists in your area.

 

What Causes Emotional Overeating Disorder?

Emotional overeating disorders can be difficult and devastating for those who suffer from them.

What makes this happen? Why is it that some people, knowingly or unknowingly, turn to food for comfort? Here are some thoughts and ideas on those questions.

Emotional overeating disorder is a general term that refers to any of various eating habits where genuine hunger is not the motivational factor.

It is more common among women than men, but men are not immune – especially young men in their teens and twenties.

Those who suffer from this disorder associate food with emotional comfort, and will turn to eating to escape negative feelings.

Past Trauma

For some with emotional overeating disorder, the problem stems from past traumatic events.

Someone who suffered sexual abuse, for example, or some other kind of sexual trauma may overeat in response to feelings of anxiety and confusion.

The result is a fatter body, which some sources suggest may cause the sufferer to feel “protected” from being attractive to the opposite sex. Subconsciously or consciously, the sufferer wants to be unattractive.

Other examples of past trauma or unmet needs may cause a person to turn to emotional overeating.

Poor Self-Image

People who suffer from low self-esteem and a negative self-image may seek escape by overeating. In a way, emotional overeating is a physical expression of what the sufferer feels inside, and the resulting weight projects the same image of self-disrespect.

Self-Medication

Like alcoholics, those who struggle with emotional overeating may be unconsciously using food as a drug. Eating numbs or dulls the emotions that might be too hard to deal with otherwise.

Depression

Studies indicate a strong correlation between depression and emotional overeating. Ironically, sometimes as depression grows worse a sufferer loses weight; weight loss means the sufferer is not eating as much, and therefore not engaging in his or her coping mechanism.

Stress

Prolonged, unrelieved stress can have a profound effect on the body. Stress stimulates the body to produce, among other chemicals, the hormone cortisol.

Cortisol apparently has a hunger-stimulating effect, and as the stressful emotions increase along with the cortisol, a cycle of emotional eating can play out.

Individual Triggers

There are triggers or causes of emotional overeating that are not necessarily in the categories above. Some examples might be:

* Boredom
* Oral need or a need to satisfy your mouth’s need to do something
* Social pressure or embarrassment at eating in public, resulting in overeating in private
* Financial stress
* Relationship difficulties

Nutritional Treatments for Emotional Overeating

It may seem ironic to turn to nutritional treatments for emotional overeating – after all, isn’t the problem too much eating?

Why would you want to look at more foods you need to eat? But more and more experts are seeing the connection between nutrition and emotional overeating.

The fact is, when you overeat in response to emotions, you may not be eating the healthiest foods. You become full – even sick – on junk foods, and there’s no room left for the good stuff.

It’s common knowledge that you do need the right nutrients to be healthy, and if those foods are not being eaten, then it’s more a matter of quality than quantity.

Nutritional Deficiencies

Another aspect of emotional overeating may be nutritional deficiencies – and the deficiencies might bring on cravings.

The theory is that the body craves certain foods in response to a need – in the case of emotional overeating, the need is emotional but it may also be physical.

For example, a craving for ice cream may signify your body’s need for calcium.

Here are some vitamins and minerals that, according to research, are implicated in the management of emotional overeating.

# Vitamin D

This vitamin’s effect on mood is well-documented, and is even suggested for people who suffer from certain depressive disorders, such as Seasonal Affective Disorder. Foods high in Vitamin D include:

* Cod liver oil
* Sockeye salmon
* Soymilk (fortified with Vitamin D)
* Cow’s milk

Remember that Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, so sources with healthy fats, such as fish, may be absorbed better by the body.

# B-complex Vitamins

These important vitamins help increase energy levels and manage water retention. Foods with B vitamins include:

* Yogurt
* Eggs
* Lean beef (B12)
* Dark leafy greens (kale, broccoli, spinach)

# Magnesium and Calcium

This is a powerful pair – many supplements put them together in one pill or capsule. These minerals are important for managing muscle and nerve tension.

Interestingly, when these minerals occur naturally in foods, there is usually a higher proportion of magnesium to calcium, whereas supplements generally have more calcium than magnesium. Foods include:

* Beans
* Nuts, especially peanuts, hazelnuts, and pecans
* Corn

# Zinc

Zinc has been shown to have a profound effect on appetite and cravings, and many people with eating disorders are deficient in this mineral. Zinc is found in the following foods:

* Shellfish, especially oysters and crab
* Beef, particularly beef shanks
* Pork
* Chicken
* Garbanzo beans

Making deliberate, conscious choices about what you do eat can go a long way toward managing emotional overeating. Plan your meals and make a shopping list, and be proactive about meeting your nutritional needs.

 

Lifestyle Choices: Learn to Overcome Emotional Overeating

Overcoming emotional overeating can seem overwhelming, and setbacks can be expected.

But the good news is, there are lifestyle choices that you can make to help overcome this problem. The key word is choice – you can choose to follow a healthy lifestyle.

Sometimes it helps to break things down into small, specific steps you can take (just trying to lead a “healthier lifestyle” is a bit vague!). Following are some of these specifics. And remember, setbacks and relapses are not unusual.
Don’t beat yourself up; just start fresh tomorrow.

Exercise

Experts are in general agreement that regular exercise three to five days a week is most beneficial. This exercise should consist of at least 20 minutes of cardiovascular exercise (such as vigorous walking, jogging, biking, etc.) followed by some light toning or weight training. Committing to this regimen full-force is not necessarily the best way to go; if you can only exercise once or twice a week, that’s still better than nothing and will hopefully pave the way for more in the future.

Exercise is said to relieve emotional overeating in several ways. For one, exercise produces endorphins which are the body’s natural “feel good” hormones. For another, exercise prevents boredom and mindless eating, which is what you might be doing if you weren’t exercising! And finally, exercise will likely boost your self-image, helping to break the cycle of low self-esteem and poor self-image that “feeds” emotional overeating disorder.

Nature

Never underestimate the healing power of nature! For those with emotional overeating disorder, choosing to spend more time out in nature can be particularly beneficial. After all, in the natural realm there are no media messages to mess with your self-image, and being in nature connects you to your origins and the origins of food.
Some experts theorize that detachment from food and its natural source plays a role in emotional overeating disorder. Getting involved in nature and exploring and appreciating it can go a long way toward reconnecting with our biologically normal view of food. Maybe you can kill two birds with one stone and do your regular exercise outdoors!

 

Tips on Overcoming Emotional Overeating

Emotional overeating is almost a joke in our society – movies, TV shows, and the resulting stereotypes cause many of us to laugh about how much ice cream it takes to get over a boyfriend, or how much chocolate we need to overcome rejection. But for those who actually suffer from emotional overeating, it’s anything but funny.

First, it helps to be honest with yourself and identify if you have this problem or not. Here are some tips to help you know if you are an emotional overeater or not.

1. Keep a food diary. In this diary, in addition to noting everything you eat, also note how you feel when you eat – sad, angry, upset, elated, joyful, etc. Don’t judge yourself or make any changes to your habits when you begin keeping this diary; you’re not trying to impress anyone or prove anything. You are trying to get an honest picture of your eating habits. After several weeks, a pattern will probably emerge.

2. Are you under a lot of stress? Do you find that you gain weight when under stress? There are other factors that can come into play, of course, causing you to gain weight. But this is something to consider if you are trying to figure out if you have an emotional overeating problem or not.

3. Get advice from a therapist or specialist if you really want to find out if you are a victim of emotional overeating.

How Can It Be Overcome?

If you have identified emotional overeating as something you suffer from, you may benefit from some tips on overcoming this problem. Here are some to consider.

1. Seek stress relief

If you overeat in response to stress, it makes sense to find alternative ways to relieve and manage that stress. Meditation, Yoga, Pilates, martial arts, and other regular forms of exercise and relaxation techniques can help alleviate the stress that is triggering your overeating.

2. Swap goodies for goodies

Try to find substitutions for the comfort foods or food rewards you seek when you are feeling positive or negative emotions. Having something in place already is key – keep a list handy or other reminder that will prompt you to turn to the alternative rather than the candy bar. (Some alone time, a short walk, reading a magazine or book for pleasure, doing your nails, etc. are all little emotional pick-me-ups that you can implement in place of food.)

3. Why am I doing this?

Before eating, ask yourself why you are doing it. Do you feel genuinely hungry? If you’re truly hungry, you may feel fatigued and, of course, feel hunger in your stomach. Ask yourself if you really feel hungry or if you are seeking an energy boost or a calming effect instead.

 

Could Your Weight Gain Be the Result of Emotional Overeating?

Weight gain is frustrating enough, but when you can’t seem to identify the cause(s) of it, the frustration is compounded. Emotional overeating is a somewhat sneaky problem – because it can involve mindless eating, it’s the sort of thing that can occur without you realizing it. If you are having trouble figuring out what’s causing your weight gain, here are some tips on identifying emotional overeating (as opposed to just overeating).

Seemingly Unexplainable Weight Gain

If you are gaining weight and you can’t seem to figure out why, this is (ironically) a sign that the problem may lie with emotional overeating. As noted above, you often don’t know you’re doing it when it comes to emotional overeating. You may even be working out regularly and preparing healthy meals and still gaining weight, because you are mindlessly eating other foods when you feel negative emotions.

A Sudden Urge

Sources say that emotional “hunger” comes on quite suddenly, perhaps in the form of an irresistible craving for a certain food or just the urge to eat right now. True hunger is usually more gradual than that – unless you have low blood sugar or have gone a very long time without eating, true hunger does not usually take the form of an urgent need to eat a whole lot right away.

Depression

More and more the connection between emotional overeating and depression is being discovered. Do you feel depressed periodically? When you even think of feeling depressed, what goes through your mind? How do you cope? If you are picturing a big serving of your favorite comfort food, then this may be a sign that your overeating is emotion-based.

Stress

Are you going through a stressful time in your life simultaneous to your weight gain? Have you seen that pattern before? Stress, with its accompanying anxiety and other negative feelings, can trigger someone to overeat in response to those feelings.

Guilt

How do you feel after you eat? Are you consumed with guilt? Do you feel ashamed? These feelings are signs that you have a problem with emotional overeating. Normal eating to satisfy normal hunger does not make a person feel guilty.

Specific Cravings

As many parents know, genuine hunger usually means that you’re more open to various food options. In emotional overeating, though, cravings may be so specific that no other food will do to satisfy your “hunger.” You feel like you have to have that particular food to feel satisfied.

 

Weight Loss Surgery: Can It Help with Emotional Overeating?

If you have trouble with emotional overeating, you may have considered weight loss surgery of some sort. But how do you know if it’s for you? What kinds of surgery options are available? Here are some ideas as to the more common surgical options currently available and some of the better-known pros and cons associated with them.

1. Lap-Band

This is a type of restrictive weight loss surgery, and it is adjustable. A silicon doughnut or ring is placed around the top of the stomach, leaving a small pouch above the ring. This is where the food goes first, and the pouch, being so small, fills up quickly. The person feels full on less food, in other words. Slowly, the food makes its way from the pouch into the main stomach.

The doctor or surgeon may, from time to time, inject saline into the ring in order to inflate it, thus decreasing the pouch’s capacity even further. The opposite can be done as well.

Pros:

* It’s adjustable, as noted above – fluid can be removed or injected into the ring.
* The digestive process is not compromised; food is digested “the usual way.”
* The surgical procedure is usually done laproscopically, meaning it’s minimally invasive.

Cons:

* Additional surgery may be required in the case of twisting of the access port or perforation of the stomach.
* Weight loss tends to be rather slow and gradual, and not as dramatic as some other options.
* Repeated follow-up visits with your doctor are required.

2. Gastric Bypass

This is what’s known as a malabsorptive technique. In gastric bypass surgery, a small pouch is created at the top of the stomach using “staples” rather than a ring. Then part of the small intestine is re-routed to connect to this pouch, essentially creating a permanently smaller stomach. It is called “bypass” surgery because food bypasses the rest of the stomach and the original small intestine connection, called the duodenum.

Pros:

* Weight loss tends to be significant and permanent.
* Mild side effects, such as heartburn, tend to be resolved easily.

Cons:

* Compromised nutrient absorption is a significant concern, and patients are generally required to take many supplements to prevent nutritional deficiency.
* Dumping syndrome, or a too-fast emptying of stomach contents, is a potentially difficult side effect.
* It’s harder for doctors to view the stomach and intestine via endoscopy, meaning cancer and other problems may go undetected.

These are just two of the more common types of weight loss surgery. The bottom line is, weight loss surgery can help with the weight gain and excessive caloric intake associated with emotional overeating, but it does not address the underlying emotional issues. If you do choose some sort of surgery to treat emotional overeating, it’s a good idea to make sure it’s part of a “whole person” treatment plan that includes counseling and emotional therapy.

 

Emotional Overeating: Knowing Where to Turn

Emotional overeating can seem like a prison with no way out, and when you do think of seeking treatment, it can seem too overwhelming to consider. Sometimes it helps to have some simple steps and treatment programs laid out clearly, so it doesn’t seem so overwhelming. Following is a list of common treatment options for emotional overeating disorder, as well as some tips on things you can do and some cautions on what not to do.

Common Treatments

First, recognize your problem. Know you’re not alone – the number of people who suffer from emotional overeating disorder is significant.

* Counseling – Individual, group, or family counseling can prove very helpful for people who experience emotional overeating. Counseling treatment usually involves some nutritional and dietary guidelines and treatment of underlying emotional problems.

* Surgery – This is a somewhat controversial treatment for emotional overeating – it addresses the physical aspect of the problem rather than the emotional. However, in combination with emotional therapy and extensive medical counseling, surgery is a viable choice for some sufferers. Usually, surgical options involve decreasing the space available in the stomach, usually by a lap-band or gastric bypass procedure.

* Medication – Under the care of a professional, medications – usually anti-depressants – have been shown to provide relief for many who suffer from emotional overeating. This may be due to the suspected connection between overeating and depression – research continues to point to the relationship between the two problems.

Tips – What You Can Do

* Exercise regularly – Yes, you’ve heard this one, but it’s really an important aspect of managing emotional overeating. Exercise may improve mood, improve energy levels, and increase your self-image – all part of overcoming emotional overeating. You can start with just 20 minutes of brisk walking three to six times a week.

* Eat well – What you do eat is as important as what you’re “not allowed” to eat! Sometimes, emotional overeaters can be overcome by cravings for certain “forbidden” foods, like ice cream, candy bars, and potato chips. But if you’re full of and surrounded by healthy foods, you can dig in without feeling guilty. Keep fresh produce on hand and eat lots of lean protein, veggies, fruits, and whole grains.

What Not to Do

* Keep unhealthy snacks handy – If you don’t have the unhealthy food in the house, you will probably be less likely to head for it in times of emotional distress. In other words, make it hard on yourself to get the foods you want to eat when feeling bad – cross ice cream, junk foods, and fatty snacks off your grocery list.

* Crash diet – Trying to starve yourself or go on an extended fast is not recommended. You may compromise yourself nutritionally and/or physically, and crash dieting tends to result in more overeating afterward.

 

Alternative Therapies for Emotional Overeating

Emotional overeating can make a person feel imprisoned – it can seem like there is no way out of the cycle of feeling sad, angry, anxious and so forth, and then eating to alleviate the emotional pain. There are treatments that are available, though – some of them conventional and some of them alternative.

Conventional therapy, surgery, and medication have all been utilized at one time or another for the treatment of emotional overeating. There are, however, some alternative therapies that are worth exploring. Here are some of them.

Hypnosis

Because emotional overeating begins in the mind, hypnosis is said to be effective because it addresses the mind directly with the power of suggestion. Hypnosis is not the mumbo-jumbo stuff of cartoons and swinging pocket watches; it’s a clinical practice and many practitioners have used it with success to treat emotional overeating.

Meditation

The intent of meditation as a treatment for emotional overeating is to “tune in” to the emotional thought center that is driving your cravings and/or binge eating. Meditation, sometimes taking a form called “mindfulness,” is the opposite of mindLESSness, which is what often happens in emotional overeating. The person does not really think about what he or she is doing; it’s mindless eating.

Herbal Supplements

It seems like every time you turn around there’s a new herbal supplement promising to help you lose weight. But there are some herbs that can help with the issue of emotional overeating. Here are some of them.

* Hoodia – This much-publicized herb is said to be effective at appetite suppression and boosting energy. Its effects tend to be subtle, and it also has a good safety record.

* Vitex – This hormone-balancing herb for women may help those whose emotional overeating is influenced by hormone fluctuations.

* Ginseng – This ancient herb is said to help sugar cravings and curb the compulsion to overeat in response to one’s emotions. Both American and Asian ginseng are purported to be equally effective.

Acupuncture

Acupuncturists are often asked if acupuncture can help with weight loss. The answer, in general, is yes – but not always. However, the good news is that acupuncture tends to be more successful with treating emotional overeating than just overeating. This may be due to acupuncture’s alleged ability to release endorphins and boost metabolism – making the client feel better emotionally, effectively curtailing the emotional overeating.

Nutrition

Interestingly, having the right balance of vitamins and minerals may affect emotional overeating – it’s not too much of a stretch to speculate that nutritional deficiencies could play a part in this kind of overeating. So make sure you’re not eating a lot of artificial, processed, pre-packaged foods; opt for fresh, whole foods as a general rule. It’s also a good idea to take a vitamin and mineral supplement that is formulated for your gender and life situation.

 

How to Eat to Stop Emotional Overeating

When you think of stopping emotional overeating, does it seem like an impossible goal? You’re not alone – many people who suffer from this problem feel imprisoned and helpless. It can seem like you are unable to break free from the overwhelming emotions and habits. But there’s good news – it’s a treatable problem.

Being honest with yourself is an important first step. Emotional overeaters tend to judge themselves pretty harshly, but don’t – you’re not an isolated case or some kind of freak. It’s a sign of strength to seek help! It means you’ve identified the problem.

If you’re struggling with this problem, there are some things you can do to get things under control while you’re seeking professional help. Here are some tips.

Your Grocery List

When an emotional moment hits and you head for the refrigerator or pantry, what kind of foods do you usually go for? Often, emotional overeaters head for high-calorie comfort foods like ice cream, chips, or candy bars. But you can’t eat those things if they are not in your house! Here are some examples of foods to put on your grocery list in place of the ones you may be tempted to buy. (Another tip – buy only the foods on your list. Compulsive buying of food is tempting.)

* Brown rice (instead of white rice)
* Millet (instead of or in addition to rice)
* Fresh fruits and vegetables (rather than canned)
* Low-fat, low-calorie yogurt (rather than ice cream)
* Popcorn kernels for air popping (rather than chips and fatty snacks)
* Lean protein like fish, turkey, and chicken (instead of deli meats and processed meats like hotdogs and bologna)
* Natural, healthy cooking oils like olive and safflower oil (instead of shortening, lard, or unhealthy oils)

Don’t Crash Diet

It’s good to be proactive in solving problems, and emotional eating is no exception. If you try to crash diet, you may find yourself eating more after the crash diet is over. So, rather than stopping eating everything you love, try some of these tips.

* Allow yourself to have a dish of frozen yogurt each week as a treat. This approach tends to be easier than just cutting out all frozen treats. You could use this approach with other “naughty” foods, too – it may be easier to resist if you know you are going to have that food on Saturday (or whatever day of the week you choose to have a small treat).

* Boost your nutrition with a good quality vitamin and mineral supplement.

* Increase your consumption of nutrient-dense foods.

Eat Regular Meals

Experts recommend regular mealtimes as a way to combat emotional overeating. If it’s not “time” for food, then you may be better able to hold off on eating until it is time. Also, eating regular meals helps you to be deliberate about your intake of nutritious foods. And finally, having regular meal times tends to make for a more relaxed eating experience, which is the direct opposite of anxiety-driven overeating.

Article on zinc and eating disorder Anorexia

https://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Article/2021/10/14/Clinician-argues-zinc-supplementation-key-to-reversing-eating-disorders

 

Categories Diet, eBooks, Stress, Weight Loss

Eat Your Way To Calm To Combat Stress

Discover a Diet and Lifestyle That Combats Stress So You Can Life A Healthier, Calmer And Longer Life! You’ll Find Out The Tips, Techniques And Exact Steps To Take To Finally Get The Results You Deserve!

Stress. It’s a normal part of human life that increases and de-creases depending on what’s going on in our personal, profes-sional, or academic lives at specific times.

Although at some point each of us will feel stressed about something, some people are affected more by stress than others. If left unchecked, stress can sometimes turn into further problems, such as anxiety or depres-sion.

Because of this, understanding how to prevent, manage and control your stress with your diet and your lifestyle is absolutely important.

Since stress can have such a huge effect on your life if left to worsen, understanding how what you put into your body can help your mental state is absolutely vital to living a life that is calm, relaxing and stress-free.

Since trying to ignore your stress won’t make it go away, it’s im-portant to know exactly what to do in order to help your stress levels remain manageable and easy to control.

One of the best ways to take control of the amount of stress which you are feeling is to take control of your diet, exercise and lifestyle habits.

When your diet and lifestyle are working together in your favor to combat and fight stress, you will find that you are better able to control any feelings of worry or anxiety that come up.

Remember that what you put into your body isn’t just important for your physical health, but also for your mental health, too!

Eat Your Way To Calm
Categories Diet, Fitness, Videos, Weight Loss

Total Body Weight Transformation

How Would You Like To Burn Fat And Build Muscle Even Faster Without Ever Stepping Foot Into A Gym?

Do you want to get into the best shape of your life? Have you tried and failed to get into great shape in the past?

Do you struggle with training programs that involve going to the gym 5 days a week for an hour at a time and starving yourself of carbs and other tasty foods?

Bodyweight training is the perfect solution when it comes to building muscle, losing weight, getting fitter and improving health all round.

This is the answer that has been staring you in the face all this time and it can work where so many other methods have failed in the past for a number of key reasons.

Categories Advice, Diet, Gut health, Health

How Food Affects your Mood

How Food Affects your Mood

Few things affect our state of mind, aka our mood, as profoundly as food. Women being propelled by some mysterious hormonal force to eat chocolate during PMS is one good example. There’s just something in that chocolate that makes them feel so good!

Aside from the emotional ties around food, such as associating it with celebration or entertainment, there is also the physiological side that affects our mood. We’ve all seen children throwing fits in the cereal aisles or at the checkout stand where all the sweets have been placed for impulse buying. I don’t know about you, but I’ve never seen such outbursts in the broccoli aisle.

People crave almost instinctively comfort foods which are high in carbohydrates, which the body immediately converts into sugar in the bloodstream upon consumption. Consuming processed and refined foods which contain exorbitant amounts of sugars and artificial ingredients and practically no dietary fiber renders the eater into a blood sugar nightmare.

Even cooked starches that some consider healthy such as potatoes, rice and pasta are converted into simple sugars quickly in the body. This gives an immediate burst of false energy and a short-lived sense of well being, followed by a nasty letdown and what some call ‘self induced hypoglycemia.’

In order to feel better after the letdown phase, which can make people feel exhausted, cranky and unable to focus, the body compels one to simply eat more of the substance that gave it that happy rush in the first place. Now we see how we get set up for addictions. Ever tried to be in a good mood, feel jubilant about life or get lots of work done when you are in the throes of caffeine withdrawal?

The main function of most anti-depressants on the market is to enhance the uptake of that famous ‘feel-good hormone’ serotonin. When this brain chemical is low, people crave carbohydrates and comfort foods in order to get it.

But if we learn how to nourish the brain properly, we need not suffer from nutrient or serotonin deficiencies and consequently we can avoid the addictions that keep us bound to the constant highs and lows. There is a sound and foolproof way to accomplish this.

One of the main reasons a raw vegan diet is so helpful in maintaining stable moods is due to the fact that there are no toxins, addictive substances or artificial ingredients in living foods. Moreover, raw foods are loaded with fiber to keep the intestinal tract and colon in tip top shape as well as clean.

If the colon is overloaded with waste, this waste is recirculated in the bloodstream again and again. How peaceful and blissful do you think you can feel with your body’s own waste nourishing your brain? Consumption of foods that are high in fiber and natural sugars also eliminates the wild roller coaster blood sugar swings which are notorious for ultimately depleting our serotonin supplies.

After a period of detoxification, which may sometimes be a bumpy road as our emotions are detoxified as well, the mind becomes clearer and sharper. Better health also brings an improved outlook on life and renewed hope that other improvements are possible. When we begin to look better, perhaps by dropping a few pounds or our skin clears up, we definitely begin to strike a more cheerful tone.

On a raw food diet, our brain becomes cleansed and nourished on a cellular level, our senses sharpen and we begin to see the sun come out in our life once again. Won’t you join me in eating naturally?

Paleo Diet
Categories Advice, Diet

The Paleo Diet

Struggling To See Results With Your Diet? Lose The Fat Forever By Learning The Secrets That Our Ancestors Knew To Maintain A Healthy And Fit Body!

Whether we like it or not, the health of our society is bad and getting worse. As technology continues to develop, convenience does as well and ordering food is literally as simple as the clicking of a button.

Long gone are the days of having to find your own food, let alone having to drive to a restaurant to get dinner.

Cooking dinner looks less and less appealing when compared to the food conveniences and choices amongst diners, catering services, fast food and takeout.

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, diabetes is now the seventh leading cause of death, just in the United States alone.

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Sensible diet tips
Categories Advice, Diet, Health

Sensible Diet Tips

Sensible Diet Tips

Start your diet with a food diary, record everything you eat,
what you were doing at the time, and how you felt.

Instead of eating the forbidden piece of candy, brush your teeth.
If you’re about to cheat, allow yourself a treat, then eat only
half a bite and throw the other half away.

When hunger hits, wait 10 minutes before eating and see if it
passes. Set attainable goals. Don’t say, “I want to lose 50
pounds.” Say, “I want to lose 5 pounds a month.” Get enough
sleep but not too much. Try to avoid sugar. Highly sweetened
foods tend to make you crave more.

Drink six to eight glasses of water a day. Water itself helps
cut down on water retention because it acts as a diuretic. Taken
before meals, it dulls the appetite by giving you that “full
feeling.” Diet with a buddy. Support groups are important, and
caring people can help one another succeed. Start your own, even
with just one other person.

Substitute activity for eating. When the cravings hit, go to the
“Y” or health club if possible; or dust, or walk around the block.
This is especially helpful if you eat out of anger.

If the pie on the counter is just too great a temptation and you
don’t want to throw it away, freeze it. If you’re a late-night
eater, have a carbohydrate, such as a slice of bread of a cracker,
before bedtime to cut down on cravings. Keep an orange slice or
a glass of water by your bed to quiet the hunger pangs that wake
you up.

If you use food as a reward, establish a new reward system. Buy
yourself a non-edible reward. Write down everything you eat – –
everything – including what you taste when you cook. If you
monitor what you eat, you can’t go off your diet.

Weigh yourself once a week at the same time. Your weight
fluctuates constantly and you can weigh more at night than you did
in the morning, a downer if you stuck to your diet all day. Make
dining an event. East from your own special plate, on your own
special placemat, and borrow the Japanese art of food arranging to
make your meal, no matter how meager, look lovely. This is a trick
that helps chronic over-eaters and bingers pay attention to their
food instead of consuming it unconsciously.

Don’t shop when you’re hungry. You’ll only buy more fattening
food. Avoid finger foods that are easy to eat in large amounts.
Avoid consuming large quantities of fattening liquids, which are so
easy to overdo. And this includes alcoholic beverages.

Keep plenty of crunchy foods like raw vegetables and air-popped
fat-free popcorn on hand. They’re high in fiber, satisfying and
filling. Leave something on your plate, even if you are a charter
member of the Clean The Plate Club. It’s a good sign that you can
stop eating when you want to, not just when your plate is empty.

Lose weight for yourself, not to please your husband, your parents
or your friends. Make the kitchen off-limits at any time other
than mealtime. Always eat at the table, never in front of the TV
set or with the radio on. Concentrate on eating every mouthful
slowly and savoring each morsel. Chew everything from 10 to 20
times and count! Never skip meals. carbohydrate, such as a slice
of bread of a cracker, before bedtime to cut down on cravings.

Categories Diet

Safeguarding Your Food

Safeguarding Your Food

Every year, an estimated 7 million Americans suffer from cases
of foodborne illness. Some cases are violent and even result
in death. Of course this is commonly known as “food poisoning.”
The culprit is food that has dangerously high levels of bacteria
due to improper cooking or handling.

Food safety is usually taken for granted by the buying public but
everyone’s attention was recently directed to food poisoning
involving some meat that was undercooked. It was determined that
the problem never would have happened if the meat had been cooked
properly. E.Coli 0157.H7 is a potent virus, but it can be
completely destroyed when the meat is fully cooked.

It is important for consumers to take an all-around safety approach
to purchasing, storing and preparing both traditional and new meat
and poultry products. Ultimately, consumers and food handlers bear
the responsibility for keeping food safe once it leaves the store.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, about 85 percent
of foodborne illness cases could be avoided each year if consumers
would handle food properly. The most common foodborne illnesses
are caused by a combination of bacteria, naturally present in the
environment, and food handling mistakes. Ironically, these are
also the easiest types of foodborne illnesses to prevent. Proper
cooking or processing of raw meat and poultry kills bacteria that
can cause foodborne illness.

When you’re out, grocery shop last, take food straight home to the
refrigerator. And never leave food in a hot car! Don’t buy anything
you won’t use before the use-by date. Don’t buy food in poor
condition. Make sure refrigerated food is cold to the touch. Frozen
food should be rock-solid. Canned goods should be free of dents,
cracks or bulging lids which can indicate a serious food poisoning
threat.

The performance and maintenance of your refrigerator is of the
utmost importance. Check the temperature of your refrigerator with
an appliance thermometer. To keep bacteria in check, the refrigerator
should run at 40 degrees F; the freezer unit at 0 degrees F.
Generally, keep your refrigerator as cold as possible without
freezing your milk or lettuce.

When you prepare food, keep everything clean and thaw out any frozen
food you plan to prepare in your refrigerator. Take it out of the
freezer in advance and place it in the refrigerated section of your
refrigerator. Always wash your hands in hot soapy water before
preparing and handling any food as well as after you use the
bathroom, change diapers, handle pets, etc. Remember, too, that
bacteria can live in your kitchen towels, sponges and dish cloths.
Wash them often and replace the dish cloths and sponges you use
regularly every few weeks.

Be absolutely sure that you keep all raw meats, poultry and fish
and their juices away from other food. For instance, wash your
hands, your cutting board and knife in hot soapy water after
cutting up the chicken and before dicing salad ingredients. It is
best to use plastic cutting boards rather than wooden ones where
bacteria can hide in grooves. Don’t take your food out of the
freezer and leave it on the kitchen counter to thaw. This is
extremely dangerous since the bacteria can grow in the outer layers
of the food before the inside thaws. It is wise to do your
marinating in the refrigerator too.

Categories Diet, Health

Macrobiotic Diet

Macrobiotic Diet

Macrobiotics refers to the science of longevity and health. It is based on the view that each person is largely influenced by their environment and social interactions as well as the geography and climate of the place they live in.

Macrobiotics views illnesses as the body’s attempt to return to a more dynamic and harmonious state with nature. It highly stresses the importance of a healthy diet as one of the major factors that affect a person’s health and well-being.

A macrobiotic diet not only refers to a daily diet, but it also embraces the importance of living with healthy lifestyle habits for the long term.

What Foods Are Included in a Macrobiotic Diet?

A macrobiotic diet prioritizes locally grown foods which are prepared in a natural manner. Undertaking a macrobiotic diet also means taking extra care in the way the foods are being prepared and cooked. There is a strong emphasis on eating foods that are baked, boiled and steamed and using little fried and processed foods.

Whole grains, vegetables, fermented soy, fish, nuts, soups, seeds and fruits are the main composition of a macrobiotic diet. Other natural food products can also be incorporated in the diet.

The composition of a macrobiotic diet can be altered in order to suit an individual’s needs, with consideration of their particular health status.

This allows those with specific conditions, or even dietary requirements or preferences, to fine-tune their diet, whilst still adhering to macrobiotic principles and recommendations.

People who are utilizing a macrobiotic diet are encouraged to condition themselves to eat slowly and chew their food thoroughly.

What Foods Are NOT Included in a Macrobiotic Diet?

Since a macrobiotic diet strongly recommends that foods must be eaten in their most natural state, processed foods should be avoided. Fatty meats, dairy products, sugar, caffeine, refined flour, alcohol, poultry, zucchini and potatoes are some examples of foods that should not be included in the macrobiotic diet.

Macrobiotics aims to achieve balance in every aspect of your life. Therefore, foods which are highly-concentrated and over stimulating should also be eliminated from the daily diet.

Macrobiotic Diet Studies

Some studies reveal that following a macrobiotic diet has helped many people lower their levels of blood pressure and serum lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides). This is why some experts suggest that this kind of diet can also be used as an effective means of preventing the emergence of many cardiovascular diseases.

Many experts also believe that a macrobiotic diet can also serve as a valuable inclusion in a cancer prevention plan. However, the macrobiotic diet remains the subject of controversy as many experts doubt its benefits when practiced by people who have diagnosed malignancies.

On the other hand, many anecdotal reports claim that its therapeutic effects are remarkable to patients who are suffering from advanced cancer diseases. However, to date very few studies have been conducted that would prove or disprove the benefits of a macrobiotic diet.

Further studies are warranted in order to prove the effectiveness of a macrobiotic diet in cancer prevention. Other concerns expressed by some experts include claimed risks of nutritional deficiencies.

However, it is difficult to dismiss the long term health benefits of any diet which is based on the consumption of organic and locally grown foods and the exclusion of highly processed ingredients.

Categories Diet, Health

10 foods that sound healthy but aren’t

1. Sweetened yogurt

The average cup of flavored yogurt has 30 grams of sugar (7.5 teaspoons) — that’s as much as a chocolate bar! Some sugar occurs naturally in the yogurt, but most is added. Instead: Cut the sugar by making your own blend. Start with plain Greek yogurt and add fresh fruit, one teaspoon of jam or a drizzle of honey.

2. Bran muffins

They sound healthy because of the word bran, right? Reality check: the average donut shop bran muffin has almost 400 calories and a whopping 36 grams (9 teaspoons) of sugar — but only 4 grams of fiber. Instead: Make your own small muffins and freeze them for grab-and-go mornings.

3. Sushi

The fish is great, but when you’re mostly eating white rice and dipping it in soy sauce, you’re getting lots of refined carbohydrates and sodium. Instead: Opt for more fish (sashimi), less white rice (or choose brown rice if it’s an option), and some vegetables on the side. Use soy sauce sparingly, and add flavor with wasabi.

4. Gummy fruit snacks

Any time “fruit juice concentrate” appears on the ingredient list, translate it to mean sugar. Isolating the sugar from fruit to make processed fruit-flavored gummies is not the same as eating nutrient-rich, fiber-filled, fresh fruit. Instead: Opt for fresh fruit or real dried fruit, such as raisins, dates or prunes.

5. Hazelnut-chocolate spread

The health halo is about milk, cocoa and hazelnuts, but the ingredient list tells a different story: sugar and palm oil are the main ingredients, and neither is nutritious. If you compare a hazelnut-chocolate spread to chocolate frosting, you will see the same amounts of sugar and fat. Instead: Stick with peanut or almond butter.

6. Veggie sticks

I don’t mean carrots and celery! I’m talking about those bags of fried or baked snacks — crunchy sticks made from corn flour and potato starch with a dusting of spinach or beet powder for color. Yeah, those don’t count as vegetables. Instead: Try a platter of real vegetable sticks — cucumbers, peppers and carrots.

7. Water with vitamins

Water is essential to life, and so are vitamins. But when the two are combined in a bottle with food coloring and sugar, an unnecessary product is created. Instead: Drink plain water or jazz it up with citrus or mint. You get all the vitamins you need from food, or you can take a multivitamin when indicated (they have no sugar!).

8. Sweetened oatmeal

Oats are a nutritious whole grain, but not when your morning bowl is coated in three teaspoons of sugar. Skip the maple or brown sugar flavor packets. Instead: Make your own plain oatmeal with grated apple, coconut, mashed banana or fresh berries.

9. Granola bars

Often touted for their whole grain goodness, most granola bars are sticky-sweet junk food in disguise. Don’t let a few oats fool you — especially when you also see marshmallows and chocolate chips. Instead: If granola bars are a must-have, choose one with 6 grams of sugar or less per bar, and hopefully some fiber.

10. Pretzels

In the low-fat era, pretzels were the king of snack foods. But now we know that their refined flour and salt are just as detrimental to heart health as fatty foods, so pretzels have been reclassified to junk food. Instead: Crunch on air-popped popcorn.

None of these foods are off-limits, but it’s important to know the honest truth behind what you’re eating. Consider the 80:20 rule: If you eat well 80 per cent of the time, it’s alright to choose some of these indulgent foods 20 per cent of the time.

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